Education, Simulation & Virtual Reality

Moderated Poster Session

MP19-20 - Analysis of gripping force on a master controller during robotic simulation maneuvers

Saturday, September 22
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location: Room 241

Introduction & Objective :

Generally robotic surgery seems to have physical advantages to improve surgeon’s ergonomics during operation. However, high levels of strain by robotic maneuvers were occured not only in neck and shoulders, but also in wrists and hands. Wrist and hand pain may be caused by an unnecessary tension on the intrinsic hand muscles. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the difference of pinch force between novices and experienced surgeons while performing a simulation task of da Vinci surgical simulator.


 


Methods :

To detect the applied force on the master controller, we attached the two force measurement sensors (USL06-H5-50N, Tec Gihan Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan) to one master controller in both sides of da Vinci surgical system (Intuitive surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA), while removing the straps and attaching aluminum plates (Figure). We selected a based on a needle driving task: Suture sponge 1 (SP) in a da Vinci Skills Simulator. We recruited 21 participants for this study: 11 experts and 10 novices. All of them are right handed surgeons. We evaluated Task score, Task time, the average force (AF) and maximum force (MF) applied to the master controller during DVSS.


Results :

Task score and task time of experts showed better results than those of novices. AF and MF of experts in dominant hand were significant smaller than those of novices (AF: Expert 4.18N vs Novice 5.39N p0.05, MF: Expert 10.7N vs Novice 9.87N p>0.05). Mean gripping force on the dominant hand correlated with the number of missed targets. (r=0.56)


 


Conclusions :

There are no reports for the differences of the applied force between experts and novices to the master controller during robotic maneuvers. This study showed that novices applied a strong gripping force on dominant hand comparing with experts. Experts seemed to apply the gripping force on dominant hand softer than novices to manage the accurate and safety maneuvers. Excessive gripping force may cause un-accurate maneuvers and be a risk factor for the hand pain. In future, we would like to plan to evaluate the usefulness of force feedback system of gripping force.

Kenji Yoshida

Lecturer
Kansai Medical University

Education and Training:
Kansai Medical University(Osaka, Japan) M.D. 2003 Medicine
Graduate School of Medicine, Kansai Medical University (Osaka, Japan) Ph.D. 2011 Urology, Medical Engineering

Professional Experience:
Years Position Title
2005 Visiting fellow, Department of Urology, Kyoto University
2014- Assistant professor, Department of Urology, Kansai Medical University
2018- Lecturer, Department of Urology, Kansai Medical University

Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Kenji Yoshida

    Kenta Takayasu

    graduate student
    kansai medical university / urology and andrology

    Presentation(s):

      Send Email for Kenta Takayasu

      Matsuda Tadashi

      Presentation(s):

        Send Email for Matsuda Tadashi


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