Category: Clinical Stones: Medical Management

MP10-3 - Public Perceptions of the Influence of Diet on Kidney Stone Formation

Fri, Sep 21
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Introduction & Objective : Dietary preventative measures are a part of both the American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for the management of urolithiasis.  Both advocate dietary counseling for patients with stones; yet, little is known regarding public awareness regarding the influence of foods and beverages on risk of stone formation. We sought to evaluate public perceptions of diet on stone risk among an unselected cohort in a community setting.


Methods : A survey was created based on the AUA guidelines on urolithiasis to assess the perception of foods and beverages on risk of stone formation. Respondents were asked to designate 20 dietary items as favorable, neutral or unfavorable.  Surveys were distributed to attendees of a State Fair. Participants were categorized into groups to determine the effect of stone history on prevention knowledge (no prior stone vs prior stone).  Patients with a stone history were further classified as either having had stone surgery or conservative management.


Results : 757 participants completed the survey including 264 (35%) with a prior stone.  Those with prior stones were significantly less likely than non-stone formers to believe stones were preventable (Figure 1).  Appropriate perceptions regarding influence of dietary items on stone formation were highest for water (>90% of participants) and cola/salt/red meat (>50%). Fewer than half of respondents correctly identified the influence of the remaining 16 substances on stone risk.  On multivariable analysis, stone formers were more likely than non-stone formers to correctly identify the influence of lemonade (OR 2.09 95% CI: 1.32-3.31), nuts (OR 2.60 95% CI: 1.60-4.23), and spinach (OR 5.06 95% CI: 2.89-8.86), on stone formation but less likely to identify the influence of coffee (OR 0.43 95% CI: 0.23-0.82) and red meat (OR 0.52 95% CI: 0.23-0.59) (Figure 2)


Conclusions : Baseline knowledge regarding the influence of diet on stone formation is low for stone formers and nonstone formers alike.  Stone formers have some unique perceptions regarding the influence of diet on stone formation, but they are not always correct.

Resha Tejpaul

Research Assistant
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Benjamin M. Marsh

Resident
University of Minnesota
Saint Paul, Minnesota

Niranjan Sathianathen

Research Fellow
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Jacob Albersheim-Carter

Resident
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Elizabeth Bearrick

Medical Student
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Michael S. Borofsky

Assistant Professor
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota