Category: Basic Science: Stones

MP2-8 - The effect of dehydrated tomato powder (Lycopersicum esculentum) intake on urinary citrate excretion in healthy individuals: A Phase II Randomized Clinical Study

Thu, Sep 20
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Introduction & Objective :

Hypocitraturia is an important risk factor for kidney stone formation. Citrate can be found in fresh fruits, such as tomatoes; however its role in increasing urinary citrate excretion is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if dehydrated tomato powder (DTP) increased urinary citrate excretion in healthy individuals.


Methods :

Between October 2017 and February 2018 a randomized, phase II clinical trial was conducted at a tertiary care center in Mexico City.  This study was IRB approved. After providing informed consent, 27 healthy subjects of both sexes from 18-65 years of age were randomized to one of two study groups. Group 1 received a normal diet during one week and for the second week they received tomato powder while Group 2 received DTP during the first week and a normal diet on the second. DTP was prepared at a Cinvestav-IPN' laboratory as powder (60 mEq citrate dose per envelope) for oral solutions and was administered twice a day during one week.  Renal ultrasonography was performed for every patient at the beginning of the study. Baseline characteristics were compared between study groups. 24 hour Urinary pH, volume, potassium, sodium and citrate excretion were measured at baseline and 2 subsequent weekly intervals. The primary endpoint was urinary citrate excretion following DTE intake in both study groups. Adverse effects were recorded for every patient.


Results : Twenty seven patients were included and completed follow up.  There were no differences in baseline characteristics between study groups (Age, sex, BMI, smoking status, and treatment adherence). Urinary citrate (Group 1: 832mg/day vs 513mg/day, p<0.01 and Group 2: 596mg/day vs 442mg/day, p <0.04) and potassium excretion increased significantly after DTP in both study groups when compared to two control measurements. Mild gastrointestinal symptoms (mainly bloating, meteorism and diarrhea) were recorded in 74% of the patients, 44.4% reported that they would take DTP again and 59.3% stated that they would recommend this treatment to other patients.


Conclusions : DTP increases urinary citrate and potassium excretion in healthy individuals. Dietary supplementation with tomato powder may further aid patients with urinary lithiasis due to hypocitraturia.   

Adrian M. Garza-Gangemi

Resident
Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán
Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico

Jorge A. Dominguez-Rodriguez

Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán
Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico

Miguel Terrazas-Cervantes

Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán
Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico

Aaron J Campos-Negrete

Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán
Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico

Rocio E. Arzate-Soriano

Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán
Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico

Guadalupe Bravo

Department of Pharmacobiology, CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico

Patrick Mailloux-Salinas

Department of Pharmacobiology, CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico

Pedro Valentin Correa-López

Department of Pharmacobiology, CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico

Rodolfo Rincón-Pedrero

Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán
Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico

Carlos E. Mendez-Probst

Attending
Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán
Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico