Avoiding Disproportionate Collapse

Single Abstract

336140 - ALTERNATIVE LOAD PATH ANALYSIS FOR MID-RISE MASS-TIMBER BUILDINGS

Friday, April 20
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Location: 202CD

Alternative Load Path Analysis (ALPA) is generally considered as the preferred approach for evaluating the robustness of structures, a strategy for disproportionate collapse prevention. The Disproportionate Collapse Technical Committee of the Structural Engineering Institute is currently developing guidelines, along with example analyses on how to perform the ALPA, to help designing structures that can bridge over damages caused by abnormal loads without propagation. However, being a new method of construction, mid-rise mass-timber buildings are not included and few studies are available on this topic. To safely expand the application of mid-rise mass-timber to constructions such as military and post disaster buildings, studies with respect to disproportionate collapse prevention are required.
This paper presents ALPA of a nine-storey timber building, with Glulam columns and Cross-Laminated Timber for gravity loading and lateral force resistance system. Nonlinear dynamic analysis is the preferred method to capture a realistic approximation of the load distribution, and hence estimate the performance of the building. The study comprises different scenarios of sudden removal of ground floor columns and investigates the subsequent structural performance. The approach fits within the chapter five, Advanced Computational Methods, of the proposed ALPA guidelines. Therefore, this study can serve as an additional example to help design professionals and code developers in the analysis for disproportionate collapse prevention for mid-rise timber buildings.

Hercend Mpidi Bita

PhD Candidate
University of British Columbia

I have completed my Masters (MSc) in Structural Engineering at the University of Salford (Manchester/UK) and
I am currently a PhD Candidate at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver/Canada) in Wood Science, under the supervision of Dr Thomas Tannert.
PhD topic is 'Disproportionate Collapse for Mid-Rise Timber Buildings'

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Thomas Tannert

Associate Professor
University of Northern British Columbia

Thomas Tannert joined the University of Northern British Columbia in 2016 as BC Leadership Chair in Tall Wood Construction. Thomas received his Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, a Master’s degree in Wood Science and Technology from the University of Bio-Bio in Chile, and a Civil Engineering degree from the Bauhaus-University Weimar in Germany. Before coming to UNBC, he worked in multi-disciplinary teams in Germany, Chile, and Switzerland and was Associate Chair in Wood Building Design and Construction at UBC. Thomas is an expert in the development of design methods for timber joints and structures and the assessment and monitoring of timber structures. Thomas is actively involved in fostering collaboration among timber design experts in industry and academia, and is a member on multiple international committees as well as the Canadian Standard Association technical committee CSA-O86 "Engineering design in wood".

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