Exhibitor Tutorial

Corning Life Sciences Exhibitor Tutorial: Hepatotoxicity Determination Using 3D Primary Human Hepatocyte Culture Systems versus Large Approved Drug Libraries

Tuesday, February 6
2:00 PM - 2:45 PM
Location: Room 1B

Hepatotoxicity or drug induced liver toxicity is a critical parameter to assess when advancing hits to leads and application in humans.

When cell culture techniques were first being developed, 3-Dimensional (3D) systems were utilized. For practical reasons related to costs and efficiency, that rapidly changed, such that today most cell culture is done with adherent cells grown on flat and rigid two-dimensional (2D) substrates, including polystyrene or glass. Advances in our understanding of cell physiology and failures in clinical trials have provided the impetus to move away from 2D systems and back to a more in-vivo-like 3D environment.

The advance of new technologies including the use of primary cells, such as Corning HepatoCells, now allows scientists to directly assess functional sensitivity of hepatocytes in a more accurate representation of the natural environment using high-throughput methods. Today’s tutorial will focus on some of these novel technologies, including the Corning® 1536-well spheroid microplate, and testing HepatoCells as uniform-sized spheroids in a pilot HTS vs ~3200 drugs. These same technologies are available for use in any number of applications. More importantly, the discussion will include the application of these 3D technologies in the lab and how they currently perform in terms of functionality for screening and early determination of hepatotoxicity.

By attending this tutorial you will learn about:
• New technologies for culturing HepatoCells in a 3-Dimensional environment for use in large scale “industrial” HTS applications
• Helpful hints for setting up and culturing cell lines in a 3D environment
• Up-to-date examples of how such technologies are being used at the laboratory bench

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Tim Spicer

Assistant Professor and Director of HTS and Discovery Biology
The Scripps Reseacrh Institute, Scripps Florida

Tim Spicer, is an Associate Director and Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular Therapeutics and joined Scripps Florida in 2005. Tim has more than 27 years of experience in drug discovery, including 10 years at Bristol-Myers Squibb. Tim is currently the director of HTS and discovery biology and co-directs the screening center at Scripps. He supervises HTS assay development & related efforts including technology development for which he has NIH funding on the 3 year award for the “Advanced Development and Validation of 3 Dimensional Spheroid Culture of Primary Cancer Cells using Nano3D Technology”. He has authored >90 drug-discovery related publications and is an inventor on 3 patents, including clinically relevant antiviral compounds.

Presentation(s):

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Ann E. Rossi

Applications Lab Manager
Corning Incorporated Life Sciences

Ann Rossi graduated from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry with a Ph.D. in Pharmacology and received postdoctoral training at the University of Chicago. Prior to joining Corning, Ann worked as a Senior Scientist at ARMGO Pharma, Inc., a small private pharmaceutical company, contributing her expertise in calcium signaling toward developing new assays for the company’s screening cascade. Ann is new to Corning Life Sciences as the Applications Lab Manager in Kennebunk, Maine and is drawing on her strong academic and industry research experience to direct the activities of the applications group.

Presentation(s):

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Corning Life Sciences Exhibitor Tutorial: Hepatotoxicity Determination Using 3D Primary Human Hepatocyte Culture Systems versus Large Approved Drug Libraries

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