History of Nutrition Forum: Historical and Current Aspects of Vitamin D Nutrition in Health and Disease

6/12/2018
8:00 AM - 10:05 AM

Location: 304

Learning Objectives:

Presentations:

Forrest H. Nielson, PhD

Research Nutritionist Retired
USDA, Agricultural Research Service
Grand Forks, North Dakota

Presentation(s):

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Hector F. DeLuca, PhD

Professor Emeritus
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, Wisconsin

Presentation(s):

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Hector F. DeLuca, PhD

Professor Emeritus
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, Wisconsin

Presentation(s):

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Glenville Jones, PhD

Craine Professor of Biochemistry, Dept Biomedical & Molecular Sciences
Queen’s University
Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Presentation(s):

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Michael F. Holick, MD, PhD

Professor of Medicine
Boston University
Boston, Massachusetts

Dr. Michael F. Holick, Ph. D., M.D., is an internationally recognized expert in the field of vitamin D, skin and bone research. He is Professor of Medicine, Physiology, and Biophysics and Molecular Medicine and Director Vitamin D, Skin and Bone Research Laboratory Boston University School of Medicine. He is also the Director of the Ehlers-Danlos Clinical Research Program at Boston University School of Medicine. He is also the Director of the Bone Healthcare Clinic at Boston Medical Center.

Over the past four decades he has made major contributions in the areas of vitamin D, skin disease, hair research, cancer research, metabolic bone disease, and calcium metabolism.

As a graduate student he was responsible for identifying 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 as the major circulating form of vitamin D in human blood. He was also the first to structurally identify the active form of vitamin D as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. As a postdoctoral fellow and medical student he participated in the first chemical synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 that was used to treat pseudo-vitamin D deficiency rickets and hypoparathyroidism.

In 1987, Dr. Holick became Director of the Clinical Research Center and Chief of Endocrinology and Diabetes of Boston City Hospital at The Boston University School of Medicine. He became Chief of Endocrinlogy, Diabetes and Nurtition at Boston Medical Center in 1992. He has initiated numerous basic science and clinical research programs. His work in vitamin D and bone health, cancer prevention and skin health is considered to be on the cutting edge. His research programs have led to significant contributions in the basic science of vitamin D in the skin health and introduced the concept of using active vitamin D to treat psoriasis. He pioneered the use of the calciotropic hormone parathyroid hormone related peptide(PTHrP) for the treatment of psoriasis and alopecia. He has recently embarked on a new program and initiated a Vitamin D Genomics Laboratory evaluating how gene expression is altered when healthy children and adults increase their vitamin D intake. His basic and clinical research activities have translated into remarkable new therapies for a wide diversity of diseases from psoriasis, hair loss, osteoporosis and new approaches for treating prostate and colon cancer.

Dr. Holick has published over 700 journal articles, book chapters, editorials, and proceedings. He has written 13 books including his most recent best seller The Vitamin D Solution. His current research deals with vitamin D production in mushrooms, vitamin D nutrition in bone health, development of global recommendations for sensible sun exposure, cancer prevention, immune function, the extrarenal production of 1,25(OH)2D and its health implications, and the novel approaches for treating and preventing vitamin D deficiency in patients with inflammatory bowel disease gastric bypass surgery using a vitamin D producing LED.

Presentation(s):

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Mark B. Meyer, PhD

Scientist
University of Wisconsin - Madison
Madison, Wisconsin

I have spent my career investigating mechanisms of vitamin D target gene activation here at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. This has encompassed identifying how vitamin D regulates the flux of calcium in the intestine and kidney, how osteoblasts mature and deposit calcium, and how epigenetics can shape the identity of each cell or tissue. The overarching theme has always been target gene transcriptional mechanisms, but a large, crucial piece of the vitamin D metabolism pathway was still poorly understood, the production of active vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). To solve this perplexing problem, we utilized the latest technologies in next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq), CRISPR/Cas9, and mouse genetics.

The CYP27B1 enzyme, which is responsible for the conversion of 25(OH)D3 to 1,25(OH)2D3, is encoded by the gene of the same name. Cyp27b1 sits in a gene dense genomic locus and is regulated by the endocrine hormones PTH and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which respond to blood calcium and phosphate levels, respectively. 1,25(OH)2D3 can also be produced to a minor extent by inflammation in many different tissues, however, the major site of 1,25(OH)2D3 production in response to these hormones is in the kidney, and unfortunately, the regulation is lost without being studied in a living kidney. Therefore, we utilized mice to identify the genomic clues for gene enhancers (epigenetics and transcription factor binding) and removed them with CRISPR/Cas9 to create mouse models devoid of PTH or FGF23 regulation. These models provide a unique perspective in vitamin D metabolism to study inflammation and endocrine production of 1,25(OH)2D3.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Mark Meyer

Lori Plum, PhD

Senior Scientist
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, Wisconsin

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Lori Plum


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