Poster Topical Area: Neurobiology

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 731

P16-029 - Effect Of Almond Consumption On Plasma Concentration Ratios Of Large Neutral Amino Acids

Monday, Jun 11
8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Objective: In this feeding trial, we tested the hypothesis whether a test meal made with almonds and honey with different proportions of carbohydrates and protein could cause significant variations in plasma tryptophan (TRP) to Large Neutral Amino Acids (TRP:LNAA) and tyrosine (TYR) to Large Neutral Amino Acids (TYR:LNAA) ratios.


Methods: After an overnight fast, five healthy subjects consumed an almond cookie with two 8 oz. glasses of almond milk. We used two versions of the cookie: they contained identical ingredients, were iso-caloric but varied in a carbohydrate/protein ratio of either 6:1 or 8:1. Blood was drawn before and 40, 80, 140 and 260 minutes after the meal and analyzed for free amino acids levels in plasma.


Results: Both cookies generated a relative peak in plasma TRP:LNAA and TYR:LNAA ratios approximately two hours postprandial. ANCOVA evaluating raw TRP:LNAA ratios adjusted for baseline scores showed a significant main effect of time (p=0.036) and a significant main effect of the dietary intervention condition (p=0.015). ANCOVA evaluating raw TYR:LNAA ratios adjusted for baseline scores showed a significant main effect of time (p=0.000). Both cookies increased the availability of TRP and TYR over time.


Conclusion: The data show that consumption of cookies made from almonds and honey, with ratio of carbohydrate/protein of 8:1 significantly altered plasma TRP:LNAA and TYR:LNAA ratios over the time period observed. For all TRP:LNAA and TYR:LNAA measures, peak plasma concentrations and peak percent change were observed at 140 minutes postprandial.









Funding Source:

The study was supported in part by a grant from the Research Allocation Committee at the University of New Mexico.


The study was supported in part from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, HSI Collaboration: Integrating Food Science/Engineering and Education Network (IFSEEN, award number: 2015-38422-24059).

CoAuthors: Nicole Chavez, MS, RD – University of New Mexico; Diana Gonzales-Pacheco, DCN, RD – University of New Mexico; Deborah Cohen, DCN, RD – Univesrity of New Mexico; Nathan Cole, MS, RD – University of New Mexico

Peter Pribis

Associate professor of nutrition
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, New Mexico