Poster Topical Area: Nutritional Epidemiology

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 750

P20-016 - Dietary Cholesterol Intake is Not Associated with Long-term Risk of Diabetes or Impaired Fasting Glucose in the Framingham Study

Monday, Jun 11
8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Dietary Cholesterol Intake is Not Associated with Long-term Risk of Diabetes or Impaired Fasting Glucose in the Framingham Study

Siyouneh Baghdasarian , Hsuan-Ping Lin, Martha R. Singer, M. Loring Bradlee, Lynn L. Moore

Objective:
Beginning in the 1960s, it was recommended that dietary cholesterol (DC) intake be restricted to no more than 300 mg/day for prevention of heart disease. While the 2015 Dietary Guidelines concluded that this was no longer a concern, some investigators remain concerned about the role of DC in the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To address this issue, we evaluated long-term risk of T2DM or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) associated with DC intakes, both alone and in combination with other lifestyle factors including diet patterns, physical activity, baseline BMI, smoking, or alcohol intake might explain the earlier findings.


Method:
Data for 2,522 35-64 year-old adults without T2DM in the Framingham Offspring Study were included. DC from three-day food records collected during exams 3 and 5 were used to classify intake as


Results:
Men and women who consumed ≥300 mg/day of DC (vs. less) had the lowest FG levels at baseline (p<0.0001). ). These subjects were 11% less likely to develop T2DM or IFG (95% CI: 0.75-1.07) over 20 years. Subjects with healthier diet patterns (e.g., higher intakes of whole grains, fruits and vegetables, fish, fiber) tended to have 15%-20% lower risks for developing T2DM/IFG, regardless of DC intake. Thus, higher DC intake was not associated with risk of T2DM/IFG regardless of other diet patterns. As expected, overweight and obesity were strongly independently associated with higher risks of T2DM and IFG but there was no association between DC and T2DM/IFG regardless of body weight. Finally there was no association between DC and T2DM/IFG regardless of smoking status or physical activity levels.


Conclusions:
These results suggest dietary cholesterol intake is not associated with the risk of T2DM or IFG in healthy adults.




Funding Source: American Egg Board.

CoAuthors: Hsuan-Ping Li, M.S – Boston Univeristy School of Medicine; Martha Singer – Boston University ; M. Loring Bradlee – Boston Univeristy ; Lynn Moore, PhD – Boston Univeristy

Siyouneh Baghdasarian

Graduate Student
BostonUniversity
Boston, Massachusetts