Poster Topical Area: Global Nutrition

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 600

P12-118 - Diets and dietary patterns of 30,967 adolescents in rural Bangladesh

Monday, Jun 11
8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

OBJECTIVES: Adolescent life in rural Bangladesh is changing rapidly and few studies have described modern dietary behaviors of this population. This study aimed to describe the diets and dietary patterns of adolescents. METHODS: 30,967 adolescents aged 9-14 years living in the JiVitA study area in northwest Bangladesh were interviewed 3x over the course of a year using a 43-item 7-day dietary recall of the frequency of non-staple food consumption. These measures were averaged to estimate normal consumption across seasons as well as examined by month to explore seasonal trends. Patterns in the consumption of food items by child age, sex, and season were extracted using principle components analysis with a Promax rotation. Unadjusted associations between dietary patterns and child age in years and sex were explored using linear regression. RESULTS: Commonly consumed foods included potato (13.7 times/7 days), eggplant (4.0), small fish (3.9), medium fish (2.7), mango (2.2), eggs (2.0), fried foods (2.0) and pulses (2.0). Many fruits and vegetables, soda (0.3) and popsicles (0.7) exhibited strongly seasonal patterns but consumption of most processed foods was non-seasonal including biscuits/cake (3.0), sweets (1.6), candy (1.5), and chips (1.0). Four dietary patterns were identified including a "Snack" pattern (chips, fried food, soda, sweets etc.), "Vegetables" pattern (cauliflower, potato, cabbage, gourd, etc), "Fish" pattern (various fish, biscuits, and leafy vegetables), and "fruits" (mango, jamur, jackfruit, gourd, eggplant) accounting for 24.8% of the variance. The "Snack" pattern was negatively associated with child age (B=-0.03, 95% CI 0.03, -0.02) and positively associated with male sex (B=0.19, 95% CI 0.16, 0.21) as was "Fish", (age B=-0.034, (-0.043, -0.025), (male sex B=0.04 (0.02, 0.06). "Vegetable" was positively associated with age (B=0.036 (0.027, 0.045) and negatively associated with male sex (B=-0.08, 95% CI -0.11, -0.06). Additional predictors of these dietary patterns will be examined. CONCLUSIONS: Snacks form a distinct dietary pattern amongst rural adolescents in Bangladesh that is more common among males. Consumption of some healthier food patterns increases with age and may be more common among girls.



Funding Source: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation OPP614, OPP114435, Sackler Institute of Nutrition Science

CoAuthors: Saijuddin Shaikh, PhD – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Sucheta Mehra, MS – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Lee Wu, MS – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Hasmot Ali, MBBS MPH – The JiVitA Project, Johns Hopkins University, Bangladesh; Kelsey Zeller, MS – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Kerry Schultze, PhD – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Maithilee Mitra – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Jinhee Hur – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Parul Christian, DrPH – Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Alain Labrique, PhD – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Keith West, RD, PhD – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Heatlh

Andrew L. Thorne-Lyman

Associate Scientist
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Baltimore, Maryland