Poster Topical Area: Diet and Cancer

Location: Auditorium

Poster Board Number: 204

P07-018 - Estimated Food and Nutrient Levels of Popular Diets Compared to MyPlate Recommendations

Monday, Jun 11
8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Objective: To compare food and nutrient levels estimated from MyPlate meal recommendations to those of vegan and Paleo meal plans derived from popular diet sources identified in the Adhering to Dietary Approaches for Personal Taste (ADAPT) Feasibility Survey (FS).


Methods:
The ADAPT FS was a web-based survey conducted using a convenience sample. Of the respondents (n=13,787), 18% reported following a vegan and 14% a Paleo diet. A total of 57% of vegan (n=1,218) and 58% of Paleo (n=961) followers self-reported primary sources (books and websites) for nutrition and cooking. Based on a random sample of 200 participants per diet group, top nutrition sources were coded. Five-day meal plans were extracted from the six most frequently cited vegan and Paleo sources to make 30 representative days/diet group. For MyPlate meal plans, USDA-compliant meal plans available online (21 days) were used. All meal plans were standardized to 2000 kcal. Weighted mean targeted food and nutrient levels for each diet group were calculated using the Nutrition Data System for Research (NDSR).


Results:
In comparison to MyPlate meal plans (expressed as a % more or less), vegan meal plans provided more whole fruit (100%), total vegetables (192%), greens & beans (383%), whole grains (123%), fiber (154%), dietary folate equivalents (85%), magnesium (70%), potassium (36%), iron (86%), unsaturated/saturated (U:S) fat ratio (98%), and less refined grains (76%), added sugars (63%), milk/dairy (90%), calcium (33%), total fat (41%), and saturated fats (67%). Paleo meal plans provide more total vegetables (112%), greens & beans (150%), total fat (111%), saturated fats (150%), and less whole grains (100%), refined grains (100%), added sugars (88%), U:S fat ratio (23%), milk/dairy (90%), and calcium (62%).


Conclusion:
Based on analyses using NDSR, vegan individuals who adhere to popular diet sources of information would consume diets that deviate substantially from MyPlate recommendations, consuming an overall more nutrient-dense diet with the exception of dairy and calcium. Adherent Paleo individuals would consume more vegetables and greens and less refined grains and added sugars, but more fat and saturated fat, and less dairy and calcium.




Funding Source:

Supported by USDA ARS agreement No. 58-1950-7-707, NIFA, USDA, agreement No. 2012-38420-30200m, and the Lisa Wendel Memorial Foundation

CoAuthors: Akari Miki – Tufts University; Alice Lichtenstein, D.Sc. – Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University; Tufts University School of Medicine; Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University; Christina Economos, Ph.D. – Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University; Tufts University School of Medicine; Sara Folta, Ph.D. – Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University; Gail Rogers, MA – Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University; Paul Jacques, D.Sc. – Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University; Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University; Kara Livingston, MPH – Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University; Nicola McKeown, Ph.D. – Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University; Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University

Micaela Karlsen

Doctoral Candidate
Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Hull, Massachusetts