Poster Topical Area: Energy and Macronutrient Metabolism

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 497

P10-098 - Effects of intermittent energy restriction with a Mediterranean diet versus the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet on overall and visceral adiposity: A pilot study

Monday, Jun 11
8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Objectives: Develop protocol, assess adherence and the short-term effects of intermittent energy restriction with a Mediterranean (IER+MED) diet vs. the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet on overall and visceral adiposity measures in East Asian adults.


Methods:
Men and women in Hawai'i (n=60), aged 35-55, BMI 25-40, visceral fat area (VFAT) ≥90cm2 for men and ≥80cm2 for women, of Japanese, Chinese, or Korean ancestry, were randomized equally to the IER+MED or DASH for 12 weeks. The IER+MED group was instructed to restrict 70% energy (34%, 33% and 33% distribution of protein, carbohydrate, and fat, respectively) on 2 days and follow the MED diet (25%, 45%, 30%) and meet their estimated energy requirement (EER) for the other 5 days each week. The DASH group was instructed to follow the DASH diet (20%, 53%, 30%) and meet their EER. Dietitians provided initial instruction for the diets and contacted participants 7 times primarily by telephone for support and compliance assessment. 4-day mobile food records were completed at baseline, weeks 6 and 11. Trained technicians measured anthropometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-based body composition, including estimated VFAT at L4-L5, at baseline and week 12.


Results:
Analyzing the 54 participants completing the study (IER+MED n= 26, DASH n= 28), the IER+MED group reported completing 90% of their restricted diet days by week 12. At week 11, the IER+MED group had a 60% energy deficit on restricted days (30%, 28%, 44%) and 50% energy deficit (25%, 37%, 39%) on non-restricted days. The DASH group had a 30% energy deficit across all days (19%, 45%, 37%). At week 12, participants in the IER+MED group lost greater amounts of body weight [5.9 (±3.1) kg vs. 3.2 (±3.4) kg in DASH; P=0.006], waist circumference (WC) [7.0 (±4.5) cm vs. 4.4 (±3.1) cm in DASH, P=0.018], and VFAT [1.3 (±29.5) cm2 reduction vs. 4.2 (±20.5) cm2 increase in DASH, P=0.43].


Conclusion:
In this short-term pilot study, the IER+MED group had greater reduction in weight and WC than the DASH group. The larger effect of the IER+MED diet on adiposity measures may be due to the IER, larger energy deficit and/or different diet composition. An IER+MED vs. DASH intervention can be implemented in an East Asian adult population in Hawai'i.





Funding Source: The William & Ellen Melohn Endowed Research Fund, University of Hawaii; Supported by the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health P30 CA071789, P01CA168530, U01CA164973.

CoAuthors: Unlee Lim – University of Hawaii Cancer Center; Kim Yonemori – University of Hawaii Cancer Center; Kevin Cassel – University of Hawaii Cancer Center; Loic Le Marchand – University of Hawaii Cancer Center; Lynne Wilkens – University of Hawaii Cancer Center; Carol Boushey – University of Hawaii Cancer Center; Yurii Shvetsov – University of Hawaii Cancer Center; Michelle Harvie – Manchester University Hospital Foundation NHS Trust

Chloe ELIZABETH.. Panizza

PhD Student
University of Hawaii Cancer Center
Honolulu, Hawaii