Poster Topical Area: Nutritional Epidemiology

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 839

P20-174 - Effects of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) on glucose metabolism in obese, prediabetic men and women

Monday, Jun 11
8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Objective: Recent studies have shown that there is an increased circulation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in obese individuals, and this is associated with impaired glucose metabolism. However, it is not known if supplementation of additional BCAA will further impaired glucose metabolism. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effects of BCAA supplementation on body weight, body composition, and glucose metabolism in obese, prediabetic individuals.

Methods: This is a randomized, crossover study with 12 obese individuals with prediabetes. Participants (n=12) were randomly assigned to daily supplement with 20g BCAA or protein low in BCAA control (i.e. 4g BCAA) for 4 weeks, then switched to the other group for 4 weeks after a 2-week washout. Subjects were asked to maintain consistent consumption of calorie and protein for the duration of the study. During each visit, body weight, and body composition were recorded, and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Collected blood samples were used to measure glucose, insulin, biomarkers such as nerve growth factor (NGF), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1).

Result: There were not significant changes in body weight, body fat and muscle mass after 4 weeks supplementation of BCAA compared to control. Serum glucose response to OGTT was evaluated by area under the curve (AUC: 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes). Compared to control, BCAAs supplementation showed a trend to normalize the serum glucose response during OGTT (p=0.055). Although not significant, the serum levels of NGF, which is associated with insulin resistance, tend to have a larger decrease by BCAA supplementation compared to control (BCAA: -29.85 ± 9.98% vs. control: -9.63 ± 8.84%, p=0.078). In addition, serum cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 were also not significantly different between BCAA supplementation and control.


Conclusion:
Together, our data suggested that BCAA supplementation did not impair insulin resistance in obese, prediabetic subjects. Further larger studies are needed to confirm the results seen in the present study.







Funding Source: Department of Medicine
UCLA Center for Human Nutrition

CoAuthors: Mark Hsu – UCLA Center for Human Nutrition; Jieping Yang, PhD – UCLA Center for Human Nutrition; Alicia Yang, RD – UCLA Center for Human Nutrition; Irene Gilbuena, LVN – UCLA Center for Human Nutrition; Gail Thames – UCLA Center for Human Nutrition; Jianjun Huang – UCLA Center for Human Nutrition; Shelby Yaceczko, MS, RDN – UCLA Center for Human Nutrition; Ana Rasmussen – UCLA Center for Human Nutrition; Susanne Henning, RD PhD – UCLA Center for Human Nutrition; Yibin Wang, MD PhD – Division of Molecular Medicine, Departments of Anesthesiology at David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angele; Zhaoping Li, MD PhD – UCLA Center for Human Nutrition

Shih Lung Woo

Postdoctoral Scholar
UCLA Center for Human Nutrition
Los Angeles, California