Poster Topical Area: Maternal, Perinatal and Pediatric Nutrition

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 299

P13-041 - Association Between Dietary Fiber Intakes and Nutrient Intakes: Data from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study 2016.

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objectives: To compare energy adjusted nutrient intakes among young children between low energy adjusted dietary fiber intake and those who had high energy adjusted dietary fiber intake according to data from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2016.


Methods:
FITS 2016 is a cross-sectional survey of children aged 0-47.9 months in the United States. One 24-hour dietary recall was used to collect data on food and beverage intake (n=3428). The energy adjusted nutrient intakes (nutrient per 1000 kcals) of children in the lowest quartile of energy adjusted dietary fiber intake (12-23.9 months ≤ 5.6g/1000kcals, 24-35.6 months ≤ 6.3g/1000kcals , 36-47.9 months ≤ 5.9g/1000kcals) were compared to those in the highest quartile (12-23.9 months ≥ 10.7g/1000kcals, 24-35.6 months ≥ 10.9g/1000kcals , 36-47.9 months ≥ 10.2g/1000kcals) with paired T-tests.


Results:
Intakes of fat and saturated fat were significantly lower among children in the highest quartile compared to the lowest quartile across all age groups. Sodium intakes were lower among children in the highest quartile compared to the lowest quartile among children aged 12-23.9 months and 36-47.9 months. Intakes of dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin A, niacin, vitamin B-6, folate equivalents, magnesium, iron, and potassium were significantly higher among children in the highest quartile compared to the lowest quartile across all age groups. Intakes of certain vitamins and minerals were lower in the highest quartile compared to the lowest quartile differentially across age groups (12-23.9 months for vitamin B-12 and calcium, 12-23.9, and 36-47.9 for vitamin D,).


Conclusions:
Dietary fiber intakes of ≥10g per 1000 calories are associated with improved average nutrient intakes of saturated fat, dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin A, niacin, vitamin B-6, folate equivalents, magnesium, iron, and potassium compared to intakes of ≤5-6g per 1000 calories among children aged 12-47.9 months. Encouraging intake of diets with adequate fiber may be an effective strategy to improve diet quality among infants and young children.




Funding Source:

Nestlé Research Center, Switzerland

CoAuthors: Brian Kineman, PhD – Nestlé Nutrition; Heidi Storm, MS, RD – Nestlé Nutrition; Erin Quann, PhD, RD – Nestlé Nutrition; Ryan Carvalho, MD – Nestlé Nutrition

Kristen L. Finn

Senior Clinical Sciences Specialist
Nestlé Nutrition
Florham Park, New Jersey