Poster Topical Area: Nutritional Microbiology

Location: Auditorium

Poster Board Number: 238

P22-009 - Effect of Pomegranate Consumption on Skin Aging, Inflammation and Microbiota

Monday, Jun 11
8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Objectives: Pomegranate is an excellent source of ellagic acid and ellagitannins. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that EA has anti-photoaging and anti-inflammatory activities. We therefore investigated if daily consumption of pomegranate extract (PomX) or juice (PomJ) for 12 weeks will reduce skin photoaging, skin inflammatory markers and alter the skin microbiota composition.


Methods:
74 healthy women age 36±4 years old were enrolled in a randomized three arm intervention study to consume PomX (N=25), PomJ (N=24) or matched placebo drink (N=25). At baseline and after 12 weeks of Pom consumption the minimal erythema dose (MED) was assessed by UVB exposure. Inner arm skin surface samples were collected with tape stripping to assess gene expression of inflammatory and collagen formation markers using RT-qPCR. Skin swipes were collected for DNA extraction for 16S rRNA microbiome sequencing.


Results:
MED was increased significantly in both PomX and PomJ consuming groups compared to placebo. The skin microbiota phylum was composed of Proteobacteria (24-27%), Firmicutes (33-36%), Bacteroidetes (11 to 15%), Actinobacteria (18 to 26%), Fusobacteria (3 to 4%) and Tenericutes (0.07 to 0.3%). There was no change in the microbiota composition on the phylum level. Comparing the PomX with the placebo group the abundance of 4 genera in the Proteobacteria, one in Actinobacteria, one in Bacteroidetes, and one in Firmicutes phylum was changed significantly. Comparing PomJ with the placebo group the abundance of two genera in the Proteobacteria phylum was changed. Gene expression of skin markers of inflammation (Smad3, Tgfβ) and photoaging (mmp1, β-integrin, stratifin and IGF1R) were not changed significantly.


Conclusion:
Pomegranate consumption resulted in increased MED indicating protection from photodamage. Gene expression of markers of skin inflammation and photoaging were not changed significantly. Further studies are needed to evaluate the association of changes in the microbiota on the genus and species level with photodamage.




Funding Source: Supported by UCLA Center for Human Nutrition.

CoAuthors: Jieping Yang, PhD – University of California Los Angeles; Gail Thames – University of California Los Angeles; Irene Gilbuena, RN – University of California Los Angeles; Rupo Lee, MS – University of California Los Angeles; Jianjun Huang, MS – University of California Los Angeles; Mark Hsu, BS – University of California Los Angeles; Yunhui Xu, Student – University of California Los Angeles; Jianfeng Long, MD – University of California Los Angeles; Jenny Kim, MD – University of California Los Angeles; David Heber, MD, PhD – University of California Los Angeles; Zhaoping Li, MD, PhD – University of California Los Angeles

Susanne M. Henning

Professor
University of California Los Angeles
Calabasas, California