Poster Topical Area: Maternal, Perinatal and Pediatric Nutrition

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 324

P13-066 - Effects of Fruit Juice Intake during Pre-Adolescence on Later Diet Quality in the National Growth and Health Study Cohort

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objectives: The overall goal of these analyses was to evaluate the impact of childhood intake of 100% fruit juice on subsequent diet quality. We explored the association between pre-adolescent (ages 9-10 years) fruit juice consumption and the likelihood of meeting Dietary Guidelines for total fruit and whole fruit intake at the end of adolescence (ages 17-20 years). The effects of earlier juice consumption on diet quality was assessed using scores on the Healthy Eating Index. Finally, we explored whether these effects differed by race.




Methods:
The National Growth and Health Study (NGHS) was a prospective cohort of 2,379 female children enrolled at 9-10 years of age. The ratio of white to black girls was 50:50. Data on physical, sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors were recorded annually. Whole fruit and 100% fruit juice consumption were assessed using eight sets of 3-day diet records collected over 10 years of follow-up.


Results:
Pre-adolescent girls who drank ≥ 1.0 cups/day of 100% fruit juice (vs. those who did not drink juice) consumed 0.44 more cups/day of total fruit at 17-20 years of age (p<.0001). Girls consuming the most fruit juice also consumed slightly more whole fruit at the end of follow-up (0.10 cups/day, p=0.0097). Total HEI scores during childhood and adolescence increased in a linear fashion with increasing fruit juice intake. In particular, the late-adolescent HEI scores for both total fruit (p<0.0001) and whole fruit (p=0.0009) increased linearly with increasing pre-adolescent juice intake. The linear association between earlier fruit juice consumption and the total fruit HEI score was similar for blacks and whites. However, a higher proportion of total fruit consumed among blacks was derived from fruit juice rather than whole fruit. White pre-adolescent girls who drank ≥ 1.0 cup/day of fruit juice were 2.6 times as likely (95% CI: 1.5-4.3) to meet Dietary Guideline recommendations for whole fruit intake; black pre-adolecents consuming the same amount of juice were 1.8 times as likely (95% CI: 1.0-3.3) to meeting Dietary Guideline recommendations.


Conclusion:
Girls who consumed 100% fruit juice at younger age in this study had higher intakes of both total and whole fruit during later adolescence and were more likely to meet Dietary Guideline recommendations for fruit consumption.




Funding Source: Juice Products Association
529 14th St, Suite 750
Washington, DC 20045 USA

CoAuthors: Li Wan – Boston University School of Medicine; Martha R. Singer – Boston University School of Medicine; Loring Bradlee – Boston University School of Medicine; Lynn Moore – Boston University School of Medicine

Phani Deepti Jakkilinki

Boston University School of Medicine
Boston, Massachusetts