Poster Topical Area: Vitamins and Minerals

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 525

P26-064 - Exploration of the appropriate recommended nutrient intake of iodine in Chinese euthyroid women: an iodine balance experiment

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objective: We aimed to explore the appropriate RNI of iodine for Chinese euthyroid women.


Methods:
A 4-week study was conducted in 25 Chinese euthyroid women. Uniform diets with different iodine contents were provided in two different periods, in which non-iodized salt was given in the first 3 weeks, followed by 1 week of iodized salt administration. The total iodine intake from diet, water and air as well as the total iodine excretion through urine, feces and respiration were monitored and determined. The sweat iodine loss was also considered. Moreover, the regression curve model between the 24-h iodine intake and 24-h iodine excretion was also established.


Results:
The 24-h iodine intake in the two periods was 194.8±62.9 μg/day (diet with non-iodized salt: 88.7%, water: 10.9%, respiration: 0.4%) and 487.1±177.3 μg/day (diet with iodized salt: 95.9%, water: 3.9%, respiration: 0.2%), respectively. The 24-h iodine excretion was 130.9±39.5 μg/day (diet with non-iodized salt, urine: 78.7%, feces: 7.8%, sweat: 13.0%, respiration: 0.5%) and 265.4±71.8 μg/day (diet with iodized salt, urine: 82.5%, feces: 11.2%, sweat: 6.1%, respiration: 0.2%), respectively. Both 24-h iodine intake and 24-h iodine excretion of the two periods were significantly different (all P<0.05).

Conclusions:
Our data showed that the estimated average requirement (EAR) was 110.5 μg/day. Therefore, the calculated RNI based on non-pregnant, non-lactating Chinese women was 154.7 μg/day.



Funding Source: Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant NO. 81330064 and 31340033) and Tianjin Science and Technology Committee Project Foundation (grant NO. 14ZCZDSY00022).
Regression of daily iodine excretion on dietary intake

Scattergram between daily iodine balance and daily iodine intake

CoAuthors: Xiaoxiao Tian – Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China; Wenqiang Wang – Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China; Guo Xiaohui – Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China; Sang Zhongna – Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China; Li Xiang – Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China; Zhang Pan – Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China; Sun Yu – Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China; Tang Caiyun – Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China; Xu Zhen – Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China; Shen Jun – Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China; Zhang Wanqi – Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China

Long Tan


Tianjin Medical University
Tianjin, Tianjin, China (People's Republic)