Poster Topical Area: Global Nutrition

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 609

P12-135 - Identifying a feasible field implementation strategy using fortified lentils to improve the iron status (Fe) status of adolescent girls in Bangladesh

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objectives: The purpose of this crossover study was to establish the methodology and logistics required to conduct a large-scale community-based efficacy study using fortified lentil as a means to improve iron status in Bangladeshi adolescent girls.


Methods:
A crossover trial was carried out in which 100 adolescent girls (12.9±2.0 years of age) consumed cooked fortified lentil consisting of 2 different cooking preparation styles (thick vs. thin) and 3 different portion sizes of lentil (raw weight 25 g, 37.5 g, and 50 g) in a counter-balanced manner. Lentils were served 5 days a week over 12 weeks with 250 g of cooked rice. Visual Analog Scales (VAS) were used to measure ratings of hunger, satiety, and palatability before and after the lentil meal.


Results:
The feeding study showed that the thick preparation of cooked lentil at the 37.5 g portion (equal to 200 g cooked dal) had higher VAS ratings compared to all thin preparations. The 50 g thick portion also had favourable VAS rating similar to 37.5 g thick portion of lentil. Considering both the amount served and contribution of dietary Fe, the thick preparation of lentil at 37.5 g would provide 6.9 mg Fe/d. This would provide approximately 86.3% and 46% of the RDA for Fe for adolescent girls aged 9-13 years and 14-18 years, respectively.


Conclusion:
Although both the 50 g and 37.5 g serving of thick lentil provided similar results, a serving of 37.5 g of thick lentil was deemed more feasible in the implementation of a larger scale human efficacy study. This preparation of cooked lentil served as a portion size of 200 g dal would require less fortified lentils and still provide dietary levels of Fe that along with other foods eaten would meet the RDAs of the adolescent girls.




Funding Source: Global Institute for Food Security (GIFS)

CoAuthors: Chowdhury Jalal, PhD – Nutrition International; Gordon Zello, PhD – University Of Saskatchewan; Kaosar Afsana, PhD – BRAC; Albert Vandenberg, PhD – University Of Saskatchewan; Diane DellaValle, PhD, RDN – Marywood University

Fakir Yunus

PhD student
University Of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada