Poster Topical Area: Nutritional Epidemiology

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 775

P20-067 - Diet Quality and All-Cause Mortality in Women after Breast Cancer Diagnosis in the Breast Cancer Family Registry

Monday, Jun 11
8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Objectives: The impact of diet quality on survival of women with breast cancer remains uncertain. We assessed whether adherence to four dietary patterns, including the Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015), Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), Alternative Mediterranean Diet (aMED), and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), were associated with all-cause mortality in women with breast cancer.


Methods:
Dietary intake was examined in 6,253 women from North America who were diagnosed with breast cancer and enrolled in the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Pre-diagnosis (n=4,883) or post-diagnosis (n=1,370) dietary intakes were estimated through a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Diet quality was assessed through scores of four diet quality indices – HEI-2015, AHEI, aMED, and DASH. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) after multivariable adjustment.


Results:
During a median follow-up time of 111 months (approximately 9.3 years), 1,334 deaths occurred. Overall, women in the highest quartile for adherence to the DASH diet had an 18% lower risk of all-cause mortality compared to women in the lowest quartile (HR=0.82, 95% CI: 0.69-0.98, Ptrend=0.04). The association was confined to women who reported pre-diagnosis diet (HR=0.79, 95% CI: 0.64-0.96, Ptrend=0.03) and those with a healthy weight (BMI=18.5-24.9 kg/m2) (HR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.53-0.89, Ptrend=0.005). Adherence to the HEI-2015, AHEI, or aMED diet was not significantly associated with all-cause mortality.


Conclusions:
Adherence to the DASH diet, characterized by a high intake of fruits and vegetables along with a low intake of animal foods, may lower the risk of death after breast cancer diagnosis.



Funding Source: NIH 5T32HL069772-15
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CoAuthors: Esther John, PhD – Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, California; Julia Knight, PhD – Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Saundra Buys, MD – Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, Utah; Irene Andrulis, PhD – Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Mary Daly, PhD – Clinical Genetics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Mary Beth Terry, PhD – Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York; Fang Fang Zhang, MD, PhD – Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts

Danielle E. Haslam

PhD Candidate
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts
Bridgewater, Massachusetts