Poster Topical Area: Maternal, Perinatal and Pediatric Nutrition

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 351

P13-093 - Exposure to a Slightly Sweet Nutrient Supplement During Early Life Does Not Change Preference for or Consumption of Sweet Foods and Beverages by Ghanaian Preschool Children

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objective: To examine the impact of supplementation with a slightly sweet lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) early in life on the preference for or consumption of sweet foods and beverages among 4 to 6-year-old children.


Methods:
We conducted a follow-up (Jan-Dec 2016) of children 4-6 y of age who participated in a nutrition supplementation trial (2009-2014) in Ghana, in which LNS was provided to women during pregnancy and the first 6 mo postpartum and to their infants from age 6 to 18 mo (LNS group). Women in the control groups (non-LNS group) received either iron and folic acid during pregnancy or multiple micronutrients during pregnancy and the first 6 mo postpartum, with no infant supplementation. At follow-up at age 4-6 y, we obtained data on children's food and beverage preference and consumption (n=985) using a questionnaire administered to caregivers. For a randomly selected subsample (n=624), we assessed preference for sweet items using a photo game. For the photo game and caregiver report of consumption variables, we examined group differences using pre-determined non-inferiority margins equivalent to an effect size (difference divided by SD) of 0.2, which is relatively small.


Results:
Median (q1, q3) reported consumption for all sweet items (times in the past week) was 14 (8, 23) in the LNS group and 16 (9, 22) in the non-LNS group. Reported consumption of SSB was 5 (3, 10) and 6, (2, 9) in the LNS and non-LNS group, respectively. In the photo game, the number of sweet items preferred (out of 30 food and beverage items) was 15 (11, 15) and 15 (11, 15) by children in the LNS and non-LNS group, respectively. The preference score for sweet items (total possible score=30) based on caregiver's report did not differ between LNS and non-LNS groups (25 (21, 28) vs. 25 (21, 28), P = 0.901). The upper level of the 95% CI of the difference between LNS and non-LNS groups did not exceed the non-inferiority margins for the sweet food and beverage preference and consumption variables, indicating that the preference or consumption of these items was not higher in the LNS compared to the non-LNS group.


Conclusion:
In this setting, where sweets were frequently consumed by all children, supplementation with a slightly sweet LNS early in life did not increase the preference for or consumption of sweet foods and beverages at 4 to 6 years of age.




Funding Source:

Funded by a grant to the University of California, Davis by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

CoAuthors: Mary Arimond – Intake - Center for Dietary Assessment, FHI 360, USA; Rebecca Young – University of California, Davis, USA; Charles Arnold – University of California, Davis, USA; Seth Adu-Afarwuah – University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana; Sika Kumordzie – University of California, Davis, USA; Maku Ocansey – University of California, Davis, USA; Brietta Oaks – University of Rhode Island, USA; Kathryn Dewey – University of California, Davis, USA

Harriet Okronipa

PhD Candidate
University of California, Davis
Davis, California