Poster Topical Area: Obesity

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 682

P23-055 - Association between overweight or obese status and vision screening results in children ages 2-5 years in San Francisco child care centers

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objective: Sub-optimal nutrition can result in obesity and other health conditions. To consider potential health impact of nutrition intervention in child care centers, this analysis aimed to determine if overweight or obese status was associated with increased odds of dental, vision and/or hearing issues in routine public health screenings in San Francisco in 2016-2017.


Methods: 
This cross-sectional analysis used de-identified data from free public health screenings offered to all children enrolled in child care centers served by San Francisco Department of Public Health Child Care Health Program between 1 August 2016 and 31 May 2017. The analysis included children ages 2-5 years who participated in BMI screening as well as dental (n=1085), hearing (n=982), and/or vision (n=1064) screening. Weight status was determined from measured height and weight, using the CDC BMI-for-age percentile cutoffs: underweight [0,5), normal weight [5,85), overweight [85,95), obese [95,100]. Children were identified as having dental issues if they had evidence of treated or untreated tooth decay; hearing issues if they had evidence of conductive or sensorineural hearing loss; and vision issues if they had visual acuity worse than 20/63, 20/50, and 20/40 for ages 3, 4, and 5 years, respectively, or a special condition (e. g, amblyopia). Multivariable logistic regression models tested for association between child weight status and the relative odds of having each other health issue, controlling for age and race.


Results:
Dental and hearing screening results were not significantly associated with child weight status. Overweight or obese status was associated with significantly increased risk of vision issues. Controlling for age and race, the relative odds of vision issues was 60% higher (Adj OR=1.60, 95% CI: 1.05-2.40) for children who were overweight or obese, relative to children who were normal weight.  


Conclusions:
The results suggest that vision screening results vary with weight status in children ages 2-5 years enrolled in San Francisco child care centers. Further research is needed to understand interrelationships between health outcomes and determine if and how nutrition intervention might simultaneously improve weight and vision outcomes.


CoAuthors: Tito Perez-Arana – San Francisco Department of Public Health; Lisa Tao-Lew – San Francisco Department of Public Health; Lauren Umetani – San Francisco Department of Public Health; Hayley Kriss – San Francisco Department of Public Health; Anna Clayton – San Francisco Department of Public Health; Jane Evans – San Francisco Department of Public Health; Jodi Stookey – San Francisco Department of Public Health

Victor Kong

Epidemiologist
San Francisco Department of Public Health
San Francisco, California