Poster Topical Area: Nutritional Immunology

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 829

E13-04 - B Cell Cytokine Secretion and Antibody Production are Modulated by Fish Oils in Obese Subjects

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Abstract

Objective: The long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in fish oil have immunomodulatory properties. B cells are a poorly studied target of EPA/DHA in humans. Therefore, in this pilot double-blind placebo controlled study, we tested how n-3 PUFAs influenced B cell responses of obese humans.


Methods:
Obese men and women were assigned to consume four, 1 gram capsules per day of olive oil (OO, n=12), fish oil (FO, n=12) concentrate, or high DHA-FO concentrate (n=10) for 12 weeks in a parallel design. Next, ex vivo B cell cytokines were assayed after stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and/or the B cell receptor (BCR) to determine if the effects of n-3 PUFAs were pathway-dependent. Finally, ex vivo antibody levels were assayed with a subset of subjects consuming FO (n=7) after TLR9+BCR stimulation.


Results:
Fish oils had no effect on the frequency of circulating levels of monocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. B cell subset analyses revealed that relative to baseline, FO lowered the percentage of circulating memory and plasma B cells whereas the other supplements had no effect. There were no post-intervention differences between the three supplements. B cell IL-10 and TNF alpha secretion were respectively increased with high DHA-FO, relative to baseline, with respective TLR9 and TLR9+BCR stimulation. OO and FO had no influence on B cell cytokines compared to baseline and there were no differences in post-intervention cytokine levels between treatment groups. Compared to baseline, FO lowered IgM but not IgG levels accompanied by select modifications to the plasma lipidome.


Conclusions:
Altogether, the results suggest n-3 PUFAs in fish oils differently modulate B cell activity in humans, which will require further testing in a larger cohort.




Funding Source: The research was supported by Organic Technologies (SRS, SD) and by NIH R01AT008375 (SRS).

CoAuthors: William Guesdon – Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University; Rasagna Kosaraju – Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University; Trac Davis – Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina University at Chapel Hill; Steve Dillingham – Organic Technologies; Shanaz Aziz – Department of Psychology, East Carolina University; Fiona Moyer – Department of Psychology, East Carolina University; James Dick – Institute of Aquaculture, University of Stirling; Michael Armstrong – Department of Pharmaceutical Science, University of Colorado; Nicole Reisdorph – Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado; Saame Shaikh – Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Traci Davis

Research Specialist
Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina