Poster Topical Area: Nutritional Epidemiology

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 821

P20-177 - Fatty- and Lean-Fresh Red Meat Intakes are Differentially Associated with Blood Pressure among Chinese Adults

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objectives: Observational studies have linked higher intakes of red meat to higher blood pressure; however, studies on different role of fatty- and lean- red meat intake are limited. We assessed longitudinal associations between fatty- and lean- fresh red meat (FRM) intake and blood pressure among Chinese adults.


Methods:
Our data are from 16,059 adults aged 18 to 65 in the China Health and Nutrition Survey from 1991 to 2011. We assessed intakes of fatty- (≥ 10 g fat/100 g) and lean-FRM (< 10 g fat/100 g) with three 24-hour dietary recalls.


Results:
Multilevel mixed-effect regressions showed that men had significant SBP decrease of 0.73 mm Hg (95% CI: -1.37, -0.09) only in the first quartile of lean-FRM intake versus non-consumers, and DBP increase of 0.48 mm Hg (95% CI: 0.09, 0.87, P = 0.03) in the top quartile of fatty-FRM intake, after adjustment for all potential confounders. In contrast, women showed significant SBP decrease of 1.03mmHg (95% CI: -1.66, -0.39) in the third quartiles of lean-FRM intake, and DBP decrease of 0.58 mmHg (95% CI: -1.02, -0.14) only for the bottom quartile of lean-FRM intake. Fatty- and lean-FRM intakes were not significantly related to elevated blood pressure risk in men and women.


Conclusions:
Greater intake of fatty-FRM was associated with higher DBP in Chinese men, whereas the favorable effects of lean-FRM on SBP and DBP in women. Further research is required to elicit the potential mechanism on gender-specific differential association of fatty- versus lean- FRM with blood pressure.


CoAuthors: Zhihong Wang – National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; Yifei Ouyang – National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; Huijun Wang – National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Jiguo Zhang


National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Beijing, Beijing, China (People's Republic)