Poster Topical Area: Obesity

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 719

P23-092 - Consumption of Dietary Whole Egg Reduces Cumulative Body Weight Gain in Diet-Induced Obese Rats

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objectives: We have shown that whole egg consumption reduced cumulative body weight gain in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat, a genetic model of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), but was without effect on body weight gain in lean control rats. Thus, we hypothesized that whole egg consumption would reduce cumulative body weight gain in a diet-induced model of obesity (DIO) using a high-fat high-sucrose (HFHS) diet (60 and 11% total kcal from fat and sucrose, respectively).


Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (5 wk of age; N=24) were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: control rats fed a casein-based diet; control rats fed a whole egg-based diet; DIO rats fed a casein-based HFHS diet; and DIO rats fed a whole egg-based HFHS diet. All rats were fed their respective diets for 33 wk and food intake was measured for the final 3 wk of dietary treatment. Mean values from all analyses were compared using a one-way ANOVA (P<0.05).


Results: In contrast to our previous studies using ZDF rats, DIO rats fed a casein-based HFHS diet did not exhibit metabolic characteristics of T2D, such as hyperglycemia or hypertriglyceridemia. An obese phenotype was achieved as cumulative body weight gain in DIO rats fed the HFHS casein-based diet was approximately 26% higher than body weight gain in control rats fed the casein- and whole egg-based diets. However, whole egg consumption in DIO HFHS-fed rats reduced body weight gain by 24% compared with DIO rats fed the HFHS casein-based diet. Moreover, body weight gain did not differ between DIO rats fed the HFHS whole egg-based diet and control rats fed the casein- and whole egg-based diets. Despite higher body weight gain in DIO rats fed the HFHS casein-based diet, total food intake per 100 g body weight was 12% higher in DIO rats fed the HFHS whole egg-based diet compared to DIO rats fed the HFHS casein-based diet. In contrast, total food intake per 100 g body weight did not differ between control rats fed the casein- or whole egg-based diets.


Conclusions: Similar to our findings in a genetic model of obesity and T2D, these data suggest that whole egg consumption reduces body weight gain in a diet-induced model of obesity, whereas body weight gain is not altered by whole egg consumption in a lean phenotype. Furthermore, the reduction in body weight gain exhibited by DIO rats appears to be independent of a diabetic state.




Funding Source: Egg Nutrition Center, Chicago, IL

CoAuthors: Caitlyn Coonts – Iowa State University; Carter Reed – Iowa State University; Kaylee Hahn – University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; Matthew Rowling – Iowa State University; Kevin Schalinske – Iowa State University

Cassondra J. Saande

Graduate Student
Iowa State University
Ames, Iowa