Poster Topical Area: Maternal, Perinatal and Pediatric Nutrition

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 323

P13-065 - Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2016: Food sources of energy and key nutrients in the diets of infants and young children in the U.S.

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Introduction

This study describes the food sources of energy and key nutrients among infants, toddlers and preschool children from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers study (FITS) 2016.

Methods

FITS 2016 is a cross-sectional survey of caregivers of children aged 0-3.9 y in the US. Demographic and feeding practices data were collected using a recruitment questionnaire (n=4380). One 24-h dietary recall collected data on food, beverage and supplement intake (n=3235). One-day food intakes were used to calculate the percent contribution of foods and beverages from 8 food groups to total energy and nutrient intakes, with a focus on nutrients consumed in excessive or inadequate amounts.

Results

Food sources of energy: Breastmilk and infant formula supplied 93% of total energy intake (TEI) among 0-5.9 mo olds and 59% TEI among 6-11.9 mo olds. Among children 12-47.9 mo of age, the top source of dietary energy was cow's milk (18% TEI 12-23.9 mo and 11% TEI 24-47.9 mo); second were meats with chicken/turkey the most common (9% TEI; 12-23.9 mo and 10% TEI 24-47.9 mo); third was fruit (7% TEI; 12-23.9 mo and 7% TEI 24-47.9 mo). Non-meat protein sources, such as eggs and egg dishes, cheese, yogurt and peanut butter were ranked fourth for 12-23.9 mo olds (5% TEI) and fifth for 24-47.9 mo olds (6% TEI). Sweet bakery items and 100% fruit juice provided 4% TEI respectively among 12-23.9 mo olds. Sweet bakery contributed 6% TEI and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) contributed 4% TEI in >24 mo olds.

Major foods contributing key nutrients: Milks, all types, were the top source of fat among 0-23.9 mo olds, and the top source of potassium, saturated fat and vitamin D among 0-47.9 mo olds. Fruits, all types, were the top sources of fiber (6-47.9 mo) and the 2nd top source of potassium (12-47.9 mo). Infant cereal was the top food source of iron among 0-5.9 mo and 6-11.9 mo infants. Ready-to-eat (RTE) cereal was the top source of iron among 12-47.9 mo children. Non-meat protein sources were the top sources of vitamin E and meats were the top sources of sodium among 12-47.9 mo olds. SSBs were the top sources of added sugars followed by sweet bakery items among 12-47.9 mo olds.

Conclusions

These findings are of importance to future dietary guidelines for the 0-24mo population and indicate opportunities to improve caregiver food choice and food product improvement.




Funding Source:

Nestlé Research Center, Lausanne, Switzerland

Emma F. Jacquier

Country Lead Scientist
Nestle Research Center, Switzerland
Florham Park, New Jersey