Poster Topical Area: Global Nutrition

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 544

P12-004 - Diet Quality in Association with Dyslipidemia and Elevated Blood Pressure in Kuwaiti Adults

Monday, Jun 11
8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Objective: Kuwaiti adults are experiencing an increasing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as dyslipidemia and hypertension. Meanwhile, Kuwaiti's diet is experiencing a rapid transition from a traditional diet to a Western diet, which may contribute to the high CVD burden in Kuwaiti population. We aim to evaluate the associations between diet quality and CVD risk factors in a representative sample of Kuwaiti adults.


Methods:
We analyzed data from 555 Kuwaiti adults (mean ± SE of age = 34.5 ± 0.65 years) with no pre-existing conditions of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, or heart disease who participated in the first National Nutrition Survey of the State of Kuwait 2008–2009. Dietary data were collected using one interview-based 24-hour dietary recall. Diet quality was evaluated according to the American Heart Association (AHA) diet score and Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015). Dyslipidemia was defined as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥130 mg/dL, and elevated blood pressure (BP) was defined as systolic BP ≥120 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥80 mmHg. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All analyses were adjusted for survey weights to generate nationally representative results.


Results:
Kuwaiti adults had a high prevalence of elevated BP (71.0%) and dyslipidemia (35.8%). The mean ± SE of AHA diet score (maximum 80) and HEI-2015 (maximum 100) was 40.2 ± 0.50 and 50.7 ± 0.59, respectively. Compared to those in the lowest tertile, individuals in the highest tertile of AHA diet score and HEI-2015 had 52% lower (OR= 0.48, 95% CI: 0.25-0.94) and 64% lower (OR= 0.36, 95% CI: 0.18-0.69) odds of dyslipidemia, respectively. Individuals in the highest tertile of AHA diet score, but not HEI-2015, had 56% lower odds of having elevated BP (OR= 0.44, 95% CI: 0.23-0.85) compared to those in the lowest tertile.


Conclusions:
Better diet quality was associated with lower odds of dyslipidemia and elevated BP among Kuwaiti adults. Our findings call for further prospective studies to confirm the association between diet and CVD risk, and underscore the potential for prevention strategies to reduce CVD burden through improving diet quality of Kuwaiti adults.



Funding Source: This research is supported by the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research and partially by the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Science Grant # 2003-1202-02.

TABLE 1 Characteristics of Kuwaiti adults aged ≥20 years (n=555), NNSSK 2008–2009

TABLE 2 Association between diet quality and prevalence of dyslipidemia and elevated blood pressure in Kuwaiti adults aged ≥20 years (n=555), NNSSK 2008–2009

CoAuthors: Fang Fang Zhang, MD, PhD – Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA; Lynne Ausman, DSc – Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA; José Peñalvo, PhD – Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA; Gordon Huggins, MD – Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA; Suad AlHooti, MS – Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Kuwait; Husam Alomirah, PhD – Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Kuwait; Sameer Al Zenki, PhD – Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Kuwait; Nawal AlHamad, MD, PhD – The Public Authority for Food and Nutrition (PAFN), Kuwait

Badreya Al-Lahou

PhD student
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA
Boston, Massachusetts