Poster Topical Area: Nutritional Epidemiology

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 762

P20-045 - Association of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk with Western Dietary Patterns in a Racially and Socioeconomically Diverse Urban Population

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objectives:

To determine the dietary patterns typically consumed by urban African American and White population and their association of the diet quality of these patterns with 2013 ACC/AHA 10-year risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD).


Methods:

Subjects were persons who completed two 24-hour dietary recalls during the follow-up wave of the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study, 2009-2013. Of the 2140 persons with two recalls, 1358 had sufficient data to calculate the 10-year ASCVD risk score. Hierarchical case clustering was used to generate 4 dietary patterns (DPs) based on food group energy contribution. The Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010 was used to evaluate diet quality. The four DPs were then used as a grouping factor in linear regression, adjusting for sex, race and income with Tukey HSD multiple comparisons used for post hoc comparison of diet quality and ASCVD risk score means.


Results:

All the patterns had sandwiches as the first or second food group contributing the majority of daily energy (10.30-16.06%). The pattern with the highest HEI-2010 score included sandwiches (10.12% of energy) along with vegetables (9.87%) and cheese/yogurt (4.99%). Persons consuming this pattern had significantly lower 10-year ASCVD risk (6.3±0.8) compared to the meats/sandwiches DP (9.6±0.9) and sandwiches/bakery products DP (9.2±0.4)(p=0.0208 and p=0.0031, respectively).


Conclusions:

HEI-2010 scores indicated improvements in diet quality were warranted to achieve a healthful diet. The findings provided evidence that variations of the Western dietary pattern were associated with different ASCVD 10-year risks.





Funding Source:

This work was supported by the Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, grant Z01-AG000513.

CoAuthors: Barry Bodt, PhD – University of Delaware; Emily Stave Shupe, MS – University of Delaware; Alan Zonderman, PhD – National Institute on Aging; Michele Evans, MD – National Institute on Aging

Marie Fanelli Kuczmarski

Professor
University of Delaware
Newark, Delaware