Poster Topical Area: Maternal, Perinatal and Pediatric Nutrition

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 379

P13-122 - Dietary intakes of fat and fatty acids by 1–5-year-old children in Korea: 2013–2015 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objectives: Although dietary fat and fatty acids play an important role in healthy growth and development for young children, there have been few studies assessing fat and fatty acids intakes in Korean children. Therefore, We examined intakes of total fat and fatty acids and their food sources among Korean 1–5-year-old children.


Methods: A total of 1,041 children aged 1–5y were selected from the 2013–2015 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Dietary intake data were obtained by a single 24-hour dietary recall and used to estimate total fat and fatty acids intakes. Food sources of total fat and fatty acids were identified based on the amounts of total fat and fatty acids consumption by each food. Total fat and fatty acids intakes and their food sources were presented by age groups (1–2y, n=401; 3–5y, n=640). Total fat and fatty acids intakes were also evaluated by living area, household income, and mother's education level.


Results: The mean intake of total fat was 27.1 g in 1–2y and 35.5 g in 3–5y, and about 23% of energy was obtained from total fat in both age groups. The mean intake of saturated fatty acid (SFA) in 3–5y was significantly higher than in 1–2y (12.7 g vs. 10.5 g) whereas children aged 1–2y had higher energy from SFA than children aged 3–5y (9.2% vs 8.3%). The mean intake of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) was 6.3 g in 1–5y with 0.8 g of n-3 fatty acid and 5.5 g of n-6 fatty acid. The percentages of energy from PUFA, n-3 fatty acid, and n-6 fatty acid were higher in 3–5y than in 1–2y. Milk, pork, and egg were major food sources of total fat, SFA, and monounsaturated fatty acid. Soybean oil was the main contributor to PUFA intake in both age groups, providing 14.3% and 21.6% of PUFA in 1–2y and 3–5y, respectively. In the group of 1–2y, children living in rural area had significantly higher intakes of PUFA and n-3 fatty acid than those living in urban area.


Conclusions: Our findings provide current information on dietary intakes of fat and fatty acids and their food sources among young children in Korea. This work could be used to establish dietary strategies for young children and investigate a relation of dietary fat and fatty acids to childhood health.




Funding Source:

This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIT; Ministry of Science and ICT) (Grant No. 2017R1C1B5017637).

CoAuthors: YounJoo Baek – Korea National Open University

SuJin Song

Assistant Professor
Department of Food and Nutrition, Hannam University
Daejeon, Taejon-jikhalsi, Republic of Korea