Poster Topical Area: Maternal, Perinatal and Pediatric Nutrition

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 338

P13-080 - Energy, fat, and carbohydrates from complementary feeding are correlated with intestinal barrier function, immune and inflammatory responses in Brazilian children

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between the intake of energy and macronutrients from habitual complementary feeding on biomarkers of intestinal barrier function, immune and inflammatory responses.


Methods:
Data from the Brazilian MAL-ED birth-cohort study, conducted in Fortaleza-Ceará, with n=233 children were used. 24h recalls from 9 to 15 months were assessed to estimate habitual intake of complementary feeding. The lactulose:mannitol (L/M) test was performed for the evaluation of intestinal barrier function. Faecal concentrations of myeloperoxidase (MPO), neopterin (NEO) and alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) of non-diarrheal fecal samples were evaluated at 15 months, as biomarkers of neutrophil activity, Th1 activity, and protein loss, respectively. Box-cox transformation was used to correct skewness and kurtosis of protein, lipids, carbohydrates, sugar, and energy intakes. These were then corrected for within- and between-person variance with ANOVA. Adjustment for the total reported energy intake was performed for macronutrients using the residual method. Spearman test was used to evaluate the correlation between dietary intake and biomarkers of intestinal barrier function, immune and inflammatory responses.


Results:
Mean energy consumption was of 870.3 (165.8) kcal, carbohydrates of 119.2 (5.2) g, proteins of 36.8 (2.0) g, lipids of 28.2 (1.9) g, and sugars of 24.3 (4.6) g. Energy intake was negatively correlated with L/M z-scores (r2 = -0.185; p = 0.015). Carbohydrate intake was negatively correlated with NEO concentrations (r2 = -0.167, p = 0.044), while lipids presented a positive relation with NEO concentrations (r2 = 0.197; p = 0.018).


Conclusions:
Complementary feeding content of energy, carbohydrates, and fat was correlated with intestinal barrier function repair, decreased intestinal inflammation, and increased local intestinal Th1 immune response, respectively. Data contribute to further discussion on the link between dietary intake and gut function.




Funding Source:

The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development Project (MAL-ED) was a collaborative project supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Foundation for the NIH, and the National Institutes of Health/Fogarty International Center.

CoAuthors: Bruna Maciel - Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte; Aldo Lima – INCT – Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro (IBISAB), Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, Brazil; Alberto Soares – INCT – Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro (IBISAB), Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, Brazil; Richard Guerrant – University of Virginia; José Filho – INCT – Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro (IBISAB), Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, Brazil; Francisco Junior – INCT – Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro (IBISAB), Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, Brazil; Claudia Abreu – INCT – Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro (IBISAB), Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, Brazil; Ramya Ambikapathi – Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA and Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Laura Caulfield – Center for Human Nutrition, Department of International Health, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Priscila Nunes Costa