Poster Topical Area: Maternal, Perinatal and Pediatric Nutrition

Location: Hall D

Poster Board Number: 269

P13-011 - Associations Between Momentary Parental Stress and Depressed Mood and Food-Related Parenting Practices at Meals: An Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) Study

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objectives: Research suggests that stress and depressed mood are associated with food-related parenting practices (i.e., parent feeding practices, types of food served at meals). However, current measures of parental stress, depressed mood, and food-related parenting practices are typically survey-based and assessed as static/unchanging characteristics, failing to account for fluctuations across time and context. Identifying momentary factors that influence parent food-related parenting practices will facilitate the development of effective interventions aimed at promoting healthy food-related parenting practices. The current study uses ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to examine the association between momentary factors (e.g., stress, depressed mood) occurring early in the day and food-related parenting practices (e.g., feeding practices, serving healthy foods) at the dinner meal the same evening.


Methods:
Children ages 5-7 years old and their primary caregiver (n=150) from low income and minority households (i.e., African American, Hispanic, Hmong, Native American, Somali, White families) were recruited to participate in this mixed-methods study through primary care clinics in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. In-home visits were conducted with parent-child dyads. EMA data was collected using parent's smartphones multiple times throughout the day.


Results:
Higher stress and depressed mood earlier in the day predicted more pressure-to-eat feeding practices and less homemade foods served at meals the same night. Effect modification was found for certain racial/ethnic groups with regard to engaging in pressure-to-eat feeding (i.e., Native American, Somali) practices or serving less homemade meals (i.e., African American, Hispanic) in the face of high stress or depressed mood.


Conclusions:
Dietitians and other professionals that work with parents and children may want to consider discussing with parents the influence stress and depressed mood can have on every day food-related parenting practices. Additionally, future research and interventions should consider using real-time interventions, such as ecological momentary intervention (EMI) to reduce parental stress and depressed mood to promote healthy parent food-related parenting practices on a day-to-day basis.




Funding Source: National Institutes of Health

CoAuthors: Amanda Trofholz, MPH – University of Minnesota

Jerica M. Berge

Associate Professor
University of Minnesota
Arden Hills, Minnesota