Poster Topical Area: Aging and Chronic Disease

Location: Auditorium

Poster Board Number: 32

P01-011 - Associations of meat consumption with insulin resistance in African American adults without diabetes

Sunday, Jun 10
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Objectives: We examined associations between red and processed meat intake and insulin resistance and the possible influence of overall dietary quality on these associations.


Methods:
The Jackson Heart Study is a prospective cohort of adult African Americans. Of the 5,306 participants enrolled at baseline (2000-04), 3,819 attended visit 3 (2009-13). Of these participants, those with baseline diabetes (n=770) and missing data on baseline diet, baseline and visit 3 insulin resistance, and potential confounders (n=970) were excluded. Our final sample size was n=2,097 (53±12 y, 64% female). Diet was assessed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Meat intake was extracted from mixed dishes. Unprocessed beef was categorized as beef; unprocessed pork as pork; cured pork, cold cuts, and sausage as processed meat; and unprocessed beef and pork as red meat. Total meat included beef, pork, and processed meat. Participants were categorized by tertile of meat consumption (ounces/day). Baseline and follow-up (visit 3) insulin resistance levels were estimated using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which is based on fasting glucose and insulin levels. Dietary quality was characterized using the Healthy Eating Index 2015 (HEI) score modified to exclude contributions from meat.


Results:
Baseline intakes of total meat, beef, and pork were not significantly associated with HOMA-IR at follow-up, adjusted for baseline HOMA-IR (Table 1). Consistent results were observed for red meat (data not shown). All results remained similar after adjustment for HEI score (Model 3). Greater processed meat intake was associated with a small increase in HOMA-IR values (Tertile 1 vs. 3, 2.25 vs. 2.48, P-trend = 0.009, Model 4). We did not observe any evidence that baseline HEI score modified the associations of total meat, beef, pork, and processed meat consumption with HOMA-IR at follow-up (P-interaction >0.1 for all models).


Conclusions:
We observed a small positive association between processed meat, but not red meat, consumption and HOMA-IR at follow-up. These preliminary data suggest that moderation of processed meat intake could be a beneficial part of lifestyle modification approaches to manage insulin resistance among African American adults without diabetes.



Funding Source:

National Cattlemen's Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff


Table 1

CoAuthors: Sabrina Noel – University of Massachusetts Lowell; Sameera Talegawkar – George Washington University; Teresa Carithers – University of Mississippi ; Adolfo Correa – University of Mississippi Medical Center; Katherine Tucker – University of Massachusetts Lowell

Sherman J. Bigornia

Assistant Professor
University of New Hampshire
Durham, New Hampshire