Panel Presentation

Are All Kinds of “Dissociation” Trauma-Related?

Saturday, March 24
10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Salon 1

The phenomenon of DID-like dissociation has been rightly understood as a psychological mechanism of coping with traumatic danger. The phenomenology of DID clearly suggests a psychological mechanism outside the person’s will and intent, which a) excludes from attention certain would-be grave developments in a dangerous event, or b) renders inaccessible certain aspects of experiencing the danger as such, e.g., emotions or memories. Furthermore, we got consistent findings of high correlation between DID and traumatic childhood. Consequently, the mere presence of DID implicates caretakers in the sufferer’s childhood for traumatic betrayal and abuse, even in the absence of patients’ memories of such behavior or other proof of it. Unfortunately, our field has stretched the term “dissociation” to include other phenomena of inadvertent inattention, notably depersonalization, flashbacks and inordinate self-absorption . This trend watered down the power of the correlation between DID-like dissociation and trauma “dissociation” and trauma because we cannot find a correlation also between generic “dissociation” and trauma. The panel will discuss the literature and their clinical experience about mechanisms and functions of various kinds of “dissociation”. They will reserve time for questions and comments from the audience.

Learning Objectives:

Paul F. Dell

psychotherapist
Churchland Psychological Center
Norfolk, Virginia

Paul F. Dell, Ph.D. has specialized in the study and treatment of posttraumatic and dissociative disorders for over 30 years. He developed the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID), a comprehensive, self-administered, assessment and diagnostic instrument. He is a past president of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD). Dr. Dell was awarded ISSTD’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011. Dr. Dell was awarded the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis' Ernest and Josephine Hilgard Award for the best theoretical paper on hypnosis during 2016-2017.

Presentation(s):

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Andreas Laddis

Private Practice
Andreas Laddis, MD
Shrewsbury, Massachusetts

I am a general psychiatrist, with some training in neurology added, but I draw my professional satisfaction mainly from psychotherapy for patients with trauma-related disorders. That began with my psychiatric training at the Sheppard-Pratt Hospital in Baltimore, USA. For many years later, I cultivated the practice of psychotherapy in state hospitals and community mental health centers.

Twenty years ago, ISSTD became my professional home, where I served two terms on the Board of Directors. Since then, collaboration with ISSTD colleagues has been the inspiration for my projects, like research, presentations and publications. I just finished five years as the Editor for Members’ Clinical Corner. I do reviews for the Journal of Trauma and Dissociation. I served on the task force that wrote the Guidelines for the Treatment of Complex PTSD.

I have been primarily a clinician. In another sense, the way my mind works while I do psychotherapy, I have always been a theoretician. Whenever my engagement with a patient becomes unproductive, I test hypotheses about the patients’ mental workings, why that happened, mostly reasons latent to patients themselves. That is how I developed my conceptual insights and treatment techniques. Clinicians commonly improvise the same way, occasionally with good outcomes. Frontiers will serve sharing such lessons collegially among front line practitioners for our Society and from outside.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Andreas Laddis

Andreas Laddis

Private Practice
Andreas Laddis, MD
Shrewsbury, Massachusetts

I am a general psychiatrist, with some training in neurology added, but I draw my professional satisfaction mainly from psychotherapy for patients with trauma-related disorders. That began with my psychiatric training at the Sheppard-Pratt Hospital in Baltimore, USA. For many years later, I cultivated the practice of psychotherapy in state hospitals and community mental health centers.

Twenty years ago, ISSTD became my professional home, where I served two terms on the Board of Directors. Since then, collaboration with ISSTD colleagues has been the inspiration for my projects, like research, presentations and publications. I just finished five years as the Editor for Members’ Clinical Corner. I do reviews for the Journal of Trauma and Dissociation. I served on the task force that wrote the Guidelines for the Treatment of Complex PTSD.

I have been primarily a clinician. In another sense, the way my mind works while I do psychotherapy, I have always been a theoretician. Whenever my engagement with a patient becomes unproductive, I test hypotheses about the patients’ mental workings, why that happened, mostly reasons latent to patients themselves. That is how I developed my conceptual insights and treatment techniques. Clinicians commonly improvise the same way, occasionally with good outcomes. Frontiers will serve sharing such lessons collegially among front line practitioners for our Society and from outside.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Andreas Laddis


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