Single Paper or Case Study

Traumatic Events, Interpersonal Relationships, and Dissociative Symptoms in Young Adulthood

Saturday, March 24
11:25 AM - 11:45 AM
Location: Logan

Traumatic events have been linked theoretically and empirically with dissociative symptoms (Van IJzendoorn & Schuengel, 1996; Putnam, 1997), however, little is known about factors that may explain this association. Further, disturbed interpersonal relationships are theorized to relate to dissociation (e.g., Liotti, 2004; Korol, 2008). The study evaluates 1) if different types of interpersonal relationships have differential associations with dissociative symptoms, and 2) if interpersonal relationships explain the link between traumatic events and dissociation in young adulthood. Participants [N=195, M(SD)=22.7(4.4) years] completed questionnaires online assessing 1) aspects of role-confusion with a parent (frightened, mother helplessness, and child as caregiver), 2) avoidant and preoccupied romantic attachment, 3) quality of peer relationships, 4) childhood traumatic events, and 5) dissociation. Individuals with a higher number of childhood traumatic events and lower quality of interpersonal relationships (except child as caregiver), had higher levels of dissociative symptoms, all rs<.05. Mediation analyses (Preacher & Hayes, 2008) showed that a frightened parent-child relationship and avoidant romantic attachment served as mediators between traumatic childhood events and dissociative symptoms. Results point out that regulation of affective states surrounding traumatic events may influence disturbed parent-child relationships and avoidant romantic attachment, and together may operate to perpetuate dissociative states in young adulthood.

Learning Objectives:

Joanna Hurley

Doctoral Candidate
Adelphi University
Garden City, New York

Joanna Hurley, M.A. is a third year doctoral student in the clinical psychology program at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York. Her research and clinical interests broadly focus on parent-child role-confused relationships and relations to internalizing disorders, dissociation, and childhood trauma. She is also completing a study on whether emotion regulation processes explain the link between maternal caregiving helplessness and young adults' internalizing disorders.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Joanna Hurley


Assets

Traumatic Events, Interpersonal Relationships, and Dissociative Symptoms in Young Adulthood



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Traumatic Events, Interpersonal Relationships, and Dissociative Symptoms in Young Adulthood