Traditional Poster Round

Poster

The impact of undergraduate interprofessional simulation in paediatrics

Tuesday, May 15
09:45 - 10:45
Location: The Gate, Atrium Level

Background: : Simulation training is a growing teaching platform effective in undergraduate teaching across numerous medical specialities including paediatrics. A paediatric interprofessional (IP) simulation programme involving nursing and medical students was introduced in a UK teaching hospital of which the authors were a part. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive, and participants felt sessions increased understanding and familiarity between team member roles. Whilst the effectiveness of interprofessional simulation (IPS) training student teaching has been widely studied, its practical implications on the wider teaching environment are yet to be established.

Research Question: : What is the impact of undergraduate interprofessional simulation training within paediatrics?

Methodology: : This narrative literature review was created using a search string from PubMed and Embase, yielding 176 results which were then screened according to title and abstract using a predetermined selection criterion (undergraduate, interprofessional, medical student). The resulting 104 papers were then reviewed to analyse the impact of IPS training as a teaching tool for students.

Results: : Key finding was that medical students are often confident within their clinical knowledge, but lack the confidence working in IP teams resulting in high levels of anxiety prior to simulation sessions (1). Simulation was found to increase confidence and effectiveness of teamwork by enhancing skills like communication (1–12). Enhancing teamwork reduces clinical mistakes (13,15).
IPS at undergraduate level enhances students’ understanding of their roles within the IP team, as well as the roles of other professions (11,16–19). Initial IP orientation has been identified as minimising stereotypes of other professions which could hinder team effectiveness (20,21). Studies suggest trust is an important factor in multidisciplinary team working. IPS was found to improve trust among professions by exposing one another to their limitations and capabilities (22). IP debriefing was found to improve resource utilisation (23).



Discussion/Conclusions: : Students perceive IPS training as an effective method of learning and improving team working skills, which could translate into improved clinical practice and patient care. Many of the literature review findings surrounding roles, trust and confidence were consistent with the authors’ experiences. However, the feasibility of its integration into curriculum has not been fully explored. Moreover, it is yet to be established whether IPS works due to its teamwork element or due to a fundamental quality unique to this teaching method. There is also little quantitative data to support the notion that IPS improves patient care in clinical settings and the lack of longitudinal studies makes the long term impact of IPS difficult to ascertain. Few studies assess the impact of IPS specifically for paediatric teaching which is important in confirming its benefits to the specialty. Additional studies are required to fully explore the impact of IPS as a teaching method for paediatrics. Future studies could focus on quantifying the effectiveness of IPS and on how much teaching is required, whilst balancing the practicalities of providing this form of teaching.

In conclusion, IPS is a positively perceived teaching method that has the potential to enhance students’ learning which should translate into improved patient care, long term.






Tatjana Gibbons

Medical student
Imperial college london
London, England, United Kingdom

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Lydia Acquah

Medical student
Imperial College London

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Hanin Ramadan

Medical Student
Imperial College London

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Meithem Ali

Medical Student
Imperial College London

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Yasir Ashraf

Medical Student
Imperial College London

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Grace Audu

Paediatric Consultant
West Middlesex University Hospital

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Shamilla Mirza-Patel

Simulation Technician
West Middlesex University Hospital

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Hena Salam

Paediatric Consultant
West Middlesex University Hospital

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David Kessler, MD, MSc

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
Leonia, NJ

David Kessler, MD, MSc, is a longtime student of the growing art & science of simulation. David’s experience with simulation-based medical education, standardized patients, patient outcome oriented research, quality improvement, and change management has resulted to numerous grant-funded studies and peer-reviewed publications. As the director of clinical simulation for the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Division at Columbia University Medical Center David has focused on leveraging inter-professional simulation (in situ) to grow the culture of safety, strengthen teamwork/communication, and improve patient care. As co-director and one of the co-founders for INSPIRE, (International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education) an international pediatric research network focused on outcome oriented simulation research in acute care, resuscitation and skills—David has helped to grow a community of practice dedicated to collaboration and mentorship among investigators committed to scholarship in simulation. Personal interests include using simulation to plan and assess new clinical spaces, and integrating innovative technology into healthcare.

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