Traditional Poster Round

Poster

Paediatric Simulation: Assessing medical student confidence in simulated acute scenarios

Tuesday, May 15
09:45 - 10:45
Location: The Gate, Atrium Level

Context: : Acute simulation is an increasing part of medical education both nationally and at Newcastle University. It is beneficial for improving team-working and communication as well as clinical performance and knowledge (Okuda Y, 2009). Simulation training is also increasingly being used to improve patient safety (Dr. William C. McGaghie, 2011).
University curriculums are also changing, with simulation increasingly being used for clinical teaching and as part of final assessments. However, it had previously not been a part of undergraduate Paediatric teaching at Newcastle University.
We implemented a new simulation session, to meet undergraduate learning outcomes of recognising, assessing and managing acute paediatric scenarios.
Research Question:
Can simulation be used to improve undergraduate medical students’ confidence in recognising, assessing and managing common paediatric acute presentations?

Description: : Alongside the simulation team at the Great North Children’s Hospital we designed an acute simulation session which we delivered to final year medical students. The students reviewed ABCDE assessments and paediatric basic life support then undertook sim scenarios.
The students worked through acute scenarios in pairs, with cases mapped to the student curriculum to ensure relevance. After each scenario we debriefed using structured peer feedback, personal reflection and facilitator comments.
Students were asked to complete confidence scales pre- and post-session, rating their confidence relating to 10 curriculum corresponding skills. After the session a questionnaire was sent to the students to gather further comments and feedback on the session itself.

Observation/Evaluation: : 73 students attended the sessions. We were able to analyse confidence scales from 72 students.
Of the domains assessed, we found confidence had improved in all areas. Prior to the simulation, 8% (n=6) deemed themselves confident or very confident at assessing an unwell child, after, this rose to 93% (n=67 p=<0.0001) . Students also felt they had gained confidence in performing BLS with percentages rising from 12% (n=9) confident or very confident, to 95% (n=69 p=<0.0001).
Other areas also showed improvement including leadership – from 4% (n=3) of students feeling confident to 68%(n=4 p = <0.0001).
Questionnaire data was also analysed. 42 students responded, giving a response rate of 57.5%. Of the students who responded, 83% of students strongly agreed that: ‘The session was useful for my stage of training’ and 95% of students strongly agreed it should remain part of the paediatric rotation.

Discussion: : From the data gathered we concluded that simulation sessions led to improved confidence in acute scenarios. Confidence improved markedly across a range of skills, both clinical assessments and broader skills such as leadership and communication. The questionnaire feedback supports this and verified students found these sessions engaging and would recommend implementing the session for future students.





Anna Mary. Brough, MBBS. FRCPCH

Consultant General Paediatrician
The Great North Children's Hospital
Newcastle Upon Tyne, England, United Kingdom

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Jessica Hawley, MBBS

Paediatric Teaching Fellow
Newcastle Hospitals Trust
Newcastle, United Kingdom

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Aisling Chew, MBBS

Paediatric Teaching Fellow
Newcastle Hospitals Trust

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Andrew Macdonald, MBChB

Paediatric Teaching Fellow
Newcastle Hospitals Trust

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Charli Mathew, MBBS

Paediatric Teaching Fellow
Newcastle Hospitals Trust

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Peter Weinstock, MD, PhD

Director - Simulator Program
Boston Children's Hospital, MA

PETER WEINSTOCK MD PhD
Chair and Executive Director, Boston Children's Hospital Simulator Program (SIMPeds)
Senior Assoc. Critical Care Medicine
Associate Professor of Anesthesia, Harvard Medical School


A practicing pediatric intensive care unit physician, Dr. Weinstock combines >20 years in surgery, medicine, education and innovation to lead the Boston Children's Simulator Program (SIMPeds) to one of largest most integrated "return on investment" simulator enterprises world-wide. Dr. Weinstock has weaved sustainable medical simulation ecosystems into the fabric of medical centers and regional health care systems on 6 continents and is founding president of the International Pediatric Simulation Society (IPSS). He serves on multiple advisory boards including education, simulation, social robotics and AI, and lectures internationally including "TED" on combining simulation, human factors, 3DP and special effects -- all to prepare world-class clinicians and healthcare systems to perform at their best, as well as to reduce fear and anxiety in patients and families.

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