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Medical Learners’ Perceptions of Video-Assisted Self-Reflection as a Component of Simulation Debriefing

Tuesday, May 15
13:30 - 15:00
Location: Jupiter 1&2

Background: : Simulation is increasingly used within medical education. Debriefing, which is a form of post-simulation feedback, is a critical component of the simulation learning process. It is unclear however what is the optimal method of debriefing. It is common within medical education for there to be a face-to-face debrief with an expert facilitator to occur directly after a simulation session. The potential benefits of additional self-reflection in debriefing, a cognitive process in which a learner makes judgments about their performance and then draw conclusions about what they need to do to improve, is still under investigation.


Research Question: : We explored whether learners would benefit from additional self-reflection while viewing a video of their own performance in the weeks following their simulation session. The objective of this study was to assess resident physician's opinions of a debriefing technique involving additional video-assisted self-reflection

Methodology: : Twenty pediatric residents were randomly divided into a control and experimental group, stratified by training level. All participants completed a simulated pediatric supraventricular tachycardia resuscitation scenario based on Pediatric Advanced Life Support guidelines that was followed either by a standardized face-to-face debrief (control) or a standardized face-to-face debrief and additional access to an online video of their performance linked with a structured set of probing questions to aid in self-reflection (experimental). All residents were then surveyed about the role of video and self-reflection in debriefing, and their perceived ability to deal with a resuscitation case like the one reviewed in the simulation during real clinical situations.



Results: : In the time between pre and post tests, there were no significant differences between groups in number of simulations participated in, involvement in simulated or real clinical cases of SVT, or participation in PALS refresher courses

Learners in the experimental group strongly agreed that reviewing a video of their performance as part of the debriefing process would enhance their learning experience than those in the control group

Learners in the experimental group felt that viewing a confidential online video of their performance on their own time, after face to face debriefing, may aid self-reflection more than those in the control group

Learners in the experimental group also strongly agreed that they would like more training on cognitive self-reflective techniques than those in the control group





Discussion/Conclusions: : Learners viewed the use of video-assisted self-reflection as a useful tool for debriefing whether they were exposed to this method or not. Those who were exposed to video-assisted self-reflection felt more positively about it and were interested in further training in cognitive self-reflection. This study suggests that video-assisted self-reflection should be further explored as a way for improving the experiences of medical learners’ during the debriefing of simulation sessions.

It is also important to note that there was no statistically significant difference between responses to questions regarding perceived ability or confidence in leading a resuscitation team, making a diagnosis of, or managing SVT. This suggests that at a minimum, the combined debriefing technique was not perceived as detrimental to the learning process and perhaps even equivalent to the standard face-to-face debrief.





Shahzad Waheed, MD

Assistant Professor
Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador
St.john's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

Dr.Shahzad Waheed
Assisstant Professor
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

I chair the Pediatric Simulation program for Janeway Childrens health and rehabilitation Center, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. One the uniquire quality of our program is we provide multidisiciplinary simulation once weekely for upto 10 months in a year. As an educator I have been interested in exploring the supplemental method of debriefing to enhance the learning experience of our learners.

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Liam Fardy, MD

Clinical Assistant Professor
Memorial University of Newfoundland

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Roger Chafe, PhD

Associate Professor
Memorial University of Newfoundland

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Adam Dubrowski, PhD

Professor
Memorial University of Newfoundland

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Jackie Williams-Connolly, BSN

Registered Nurse
Eastern Health authority

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Roberta Hales, MHA, RRT-NPS, RN, CHSE

Senior Simulation Educator
Center for Simulation, Advanced Education and Innovation; The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

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