Wetland, Stream Bank, and Shoreline Restoration

Western Region - Case Study

Managing Stream Channel Erosion and Deposition: Development of Tools for Hydromodification Assessment and Management

Monday, February 12
9:10 AM - 10:10 AM

PDH: 1

Location: 103B

Level of Presentation: All: Suitable for a broad audience

Changes in land use and associated runoff patterns often cause substantial stream channel erosion causing hábitat loss, wáter quality degradation, and downstream sedimentation. Stormwater programs in California require new development and redevelopment projects to address and manage these effects. This presentation will cover tolos and approaches that can be incorporated into project and wátershed plans to help manage hydromodification effects.

Managing stream channel erosion resulting from changes in runoff (typically due to urbanization) is a challenge in most urban areas worldwide. In California, most municipal stormwater permits include requirements to limit channel erosion through modified development practices and BMPs. This talk will focus on work over the past ten years in California to develop tools to assess, model, and manage hydromodification effects in urban and peri-urban streams. These tools allow streams to be prioritized based on the susceptibility to hydromodification effects, inform selection of most appropriate modeling tools and help select management strategies. The presentation will conclude with recommendations for how to monitor the effectiveness of hydromodification management.

Learning Objectives:

Target Audience: Academic,Consultant,Engineer,Government Agency,Storm Water,Stream/Wetland

Eric D. Stein

Principal Scientist
Southern California Coastal Water Research Project

Dr. Eric Stein is a principal scientist at the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP), where he is head of the Biology Department. Dr. Stein oversees a variety of projects related to in-stream and coastal water quality, bioassessment, hydromodification, watershed modeling, and assessment of wetlands and other aquatic resources. His research focuses on effects of human activities on the condition of aquatic ecosystems, and on developing tools to better assess and manage those effects. Prior to joining SCCWRP in 2002, Dr. Stein spent six years as a Senior Project Manager with the Regulatory Branch of the Los Angeles District Corps of Engineers, and four years with a private consulting firm.

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