Medical Nutrition Therapy

FNCE 2018

203. Developing an Interprofessional Prehabilitation Team in Pancreatic Cancer

Sunday, October 21
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
CE: 1.5

Session Level 2 - Intermediate

Are patients with pancreatic cancer doomed to cachexia and death? In a highly catabolic disease state treated primarily by a surgery with an incredibly high morbidity rate, attempts to maintain the nutritional status and overall health of patients with pancreatic cancer are often believed to be unattainable. This session’s presenters, registered dietitian nutritionist Leah Hoffman and physical therapist Elizabeth Hile, have taken an interprofessional approach to tackle this issue by developing a “prehabilitation” program for patients prior to pancreatic surgery. The presenters will describe how they created and implemented an evidence-based protocol in conjunction with physicians, nurses, and basic scientists to improve the nutritional and functional status of patients preparing for surgery, and early results will be discussed. This session will provide an example of how to incorporate more interprofessional teamwork to address multiple aspects of patient care.

Learning Objectives:

Learning Need Codes:

  • 5150 - Cancer (disease/disorder)
  • 5410 - Client protocols, clinical guidelines (nutritional care)
  • 7200 - Team building

Leah Hoffman, PhD, RD/LD, CNSC

Dr. Leah Hoffman is a PhD-trained registered dietitian with research interest in nutrition in cancer. Dr. Hoffman completed her graduate degrees at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, and after finishing her PhD, she has been Assistant Professor and Director of the Coordinated Program for three years. She has been involved in pancreatic cancer research for ten years at the Stephenson Cancer Center, leading two projects that led to changes in the screening and postoperative care of these patients. Both projects demonstrated the need for a specialized dietitian, leading to the routine inclusion of an RD on the surgery team. This model has enabled proactive nutrition intervention for patients with cancer. She and Dr. Hile have created a prehabilitation program for pancreatic surgery, incorporating both diet and exercise. In all her research work, Dr. Hoffman has used her clinical experience to develop meaningful interventions for each individual patient.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Leah Hoffman

Peggy Turner, MS, RD/LD, FAND

Peggy Turner is an Associate Professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Since 2012, she has been part of the core faculty on campus that was charged in 2012 with researching, developing and implementing interprofessional activities for a university that has over 1100 full time faculty and 3,500 students. She has presented results of her work in this area here at FNCE in 2014 and Oxford England in 2016. Besides interprofessional education, she is also passionate about Nutrition Informatics and served as Chair of the Academy’s Nutrition Informatics Committee from 2013-2015. For the last 4 years, she has been co-faculty for the Academy’s/AMIA 10 X 10 course offered by Oregon Health Sciences Center.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Peggy Turner

Elizabeth Hile, PhD, PT, NCS, CLT/CES

Dr. Elizabeth Hile is a PhD-trained physical therapist who has practiced clinically for over 20 years. She completed a Masters of Physical Therapy (MPT) and PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh, conducting doctoral and post-doctoral research on balance and mobility in older adults and cancer survivors. She is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and Director of the Cancer Rehabilitation Science Program at the Stephenson Cancer Center. Dr. Hile and her team research how prehabilitation programs of their own design impact sarcopenia and neuropathy in pancreatic and ovarian cancers. The intensive medical and surgical interventions used to extend life in both of these cancers can cause side-effects that severely compromise the quality of one's life. Prehabilitation is underutilized, and as an active clinician, Dr. Hile is aware that there is little evidence to guide exercise prescription for these unique survivor populations. Her career goal is to advance cancer survivorship and survival through (p)rehabilitative approaches to optimizing nerve and muscle function. By maximizing physical function and mitigating accelerated aging in cancer, prehab programs can assist more survivors to qualify for the most effective cancer treatments, rather than being turned down as too frail to tolerate an intervention.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Elizabeth Hile

Leah Hoffman, PhD, RD/LD, CNSC

Dr. Leah Hoffman is a PhD-trained registered dietitian with research interest in nutrition in cancer. Dr. Hoffman completed her graduate degrees at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, and after finishing her PhD, she has been Assistant Professor and Director of the Coordinated Program for three years. She has been involved in pancreatic cancer research for ten years at the Stephenson Cancer Center, leading two projects that led to changes in the screening and postoperative care of these patients. Both projects demonstrated the need for a specialized dietitian, leading to the routine inclusion of an RD on the surgery team. This model has enabled proactive nutrition intervention for patients with cancer. She and Dr. Hile have created a prehabilitation program for pancreatic surgery, incorporating both diet and exercise. In all her research work, Dr. Hoffman has used her clinical experience to develop meaningful interventions for each individual patient.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Leah Hoffman


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