Health Care Connect - Pediatric Health Care

Treating Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Disorder and Chronic Cough in Children and Teens (HC12)

Friday, July 20
3:45 PM - 5:15 PM
Location: Room 316
CE: 0.15 ASHA CEUs/1.5 PDHs

This session is eligible for Pennsylvania Act 48 professional education hours.

This session will discuss two related disorders – paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder and chronic cough. The presenter will explore many aspects of these disorders, including how to identify each based on verbal descriptions and observed behaviors; explain the disorders to children, teens, and adults; teach treatment techniques; and gather ideas for simple materials and handouts to supplement intervention. The presenter will also discuss outcomes from her experience and research with the two disorders.

Learning Objectives:

Sally Gallena, PhD, CCC-SLP

Assistant Professor, Clinical Supervisor
Loyola University MD

Sally Gallena, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a professor and clinical supervisor at Loyola University MD, specializing in disorders affecting the laryngeal airway and the voice. She has published in Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Journal of Voice, and Seminars in Speech-Language Pathology on topics such as paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder, nonspecific chronic cough, transgender voice, and Parkinson's disease. She is the author of the text Voice and Laryngeal Disorders: A Problem Based Clinical Guide (Elsevier Publishing Co).

Financial Disclosures: Employed by Loyola University MD; financial compensation from ASHA for this presentation

Nonfinancial Disclosures: None

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Sally Gallena


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Treating Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Disorder and Chronic Cough in Children and Teens (HC12)

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