General Session

A2 — Herbst Awardee General Session: Quality Improvement in Vascular Access: Applying the Current Evidence (and Common Sense)

Saturday, September 15
10:45 AM - 11:45 AM
Location: Short North Ballroom
Presentation CE Credits: 1

Vascular access devices have a life cycle that consists of 5 phases: assessment, pre-insertion, actual insertion, dressing/care & maintenance and removal. In order to achieve optimal outcomes, our goal is to standardize the practice at each phase of the life cycle...at the highest level. A significant challenge is for us to come to agreement as to what represents the highest level of practice, based on current evidence.
Standardization has the power to minimize unnecessary variation in practice, which leads to suboptimal results. In order to achieve the lofty stated goals, this session will discuss algorythm approaches to assessment, pros and cons of the insertion bundle and the relationship between the actual insertion of a CICC to the dressing/care & maintenance phase. Considering that the insertion phase represents 1% of the life of the device and dressing/care & maintenance accounts for 99%; it becomes clear that a primary goal of the insertion is to set up the dressing/care & maintenace phase for success.

Learning Objectives:

Jack LeDonne, MD, VA-BC™, FACS

Medical Director
Chesapeake Vascular Access

Jack LeDonne is a physician with an interest in Vascular Access. He is presently the Medical Director at Chesapeake Vascular Access and a past president of the Association for Vascular Access. Jack is a strong believer in the power of clinical videos to demonstrate teaching points.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Jack LeDonne


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A2 — Herbst Awardee General Session: Quality Improvement in Vascular Access: Applying the Current Evidence (and Common Sense)

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Send Email for Herbst Awardee General Session: Quality Improvement in Vascular Access: Applying the Current Evidence (and Common Sense)