Risk and Change

Concurrent Session

M37 - Tools to Remember: RMS Titanic and Risk Management

Monday, April 30
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location: WSCC 618-620

Level: Basic

The sinking of the RMS Titanic during its maiden voyage in April 1912 is one of the worst maritime disasters in history, with over 1,500 casualties. Countless books have been written about the Titanic, songs have been written, popular movies made, and it remains a fascinating topic to this day. As a direct result of the Titanic disaster, international standards were developed that greatly improved the safety of life at sea. This session will demonstrate the application of basic quality management and risk management tools looking back and, in retrospect, looking forward to the RMS Titanic disaster. The focus will be multiple applications of cause and effect diagrams as well as failure mode and effects analysis.

Learning Objectives:

Kimball Bullington

Ph.D.

Professor
Middle Tennessee State University
Murfreesboro, Tennessee

Kimball Bullington is a professor of supply chain management at Middle Tennessee State University. Before joining MTSU in 1998, Kimball held a variety of positions in engineering and management in performance improvement and supply chain management for 20 years. Dr. Bullington is a registered professional engineer in the state of Alabama and a Six Sigma Master Black Belt. He is a frequent speaker for professional organizations on the topics of performance improvement and supply chain management. Bullington is a senior member of ASQ.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Kimball Bullington

Norma Antunano

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Norma Antunano


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M37 - Tools to Remember: RMS Titanic and Risk Management

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