Biochemistry

Abstract

CS-6-4 - Uncovering the genetic and metabolic relationship between free and bound amino acid composition in seeds using novel high-throughput quantification method combined with GWAS

Sunday, July 15
4:18 PM - 4:38 PM

Seeds are a major source of protein in human and livestock diets. However, the seeds of major staple crops are deficient in several essential amino acids (EAA). Failure to consume sufficient levels of EAA per day leads to severe malnutrition, even if one’s calories requirements are met. To improve the amino acid (AA) composition in staple crop seeds, we need a more fundamental understanding of the metabolic and genetic basis that underlie the regulation of both free amino acid (FAA) and protein bound amino acid (PBAA) pools which comprise ~5% and 95% of the total seed AA respectively. Nevertheless, despite the existence of high-throughput quantification (HTQ) method for FAA, there is no such method for PBAA. The latter prevents quantitative genomic enabled analysis of seeds AA levels and composition from large populations and further discovery of their genetic architecture and regulation. To overcome this hurdle, we developed an HTQ method that relies on acid hydrolysis followed by an LC-MS/MS-MRM approach that enables fast, precise and affordable quantification of the absolute levels of 17  PBAA.  Utilizing this method, along with FAA HTQ,  we have characterized the natural variation of both FAA and PBAA from a 360 ecotype member Arabidopsis association panel as well as a 200 lines maize association panel. Our results demonstrated surprising natural and artificial variation in both PBAA and FAA. Correlation based network constructed from the quantification of both amino acid functional pools revealed no correlation between them in both model systems. Consistently, GWAS analysis of PBAA, FAA and the ratio between them strongly suggest a separate genetic architecture for each. Our results offer novel insights to the genetic basis of the seed amino acid levels, composition and partition. It also pinpoints novel loci and strategies for future seed amino acid biofortification. 


 

Co-Authors

Abou Yobi – University of Missouri-Columbia; Vivek Shrestha – University of Missouri-Columbia; Emery Marianne – University of Missouri-Columbia; Clement Bagaza – University of Missouri-Columbia; Sherry Flint-Garcia – USDA-ARS, Columbia

Ruthie Angelovici, PhD

Assistant Professor
University of Missouri-Columbia

TITLE Assistant Professor, Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri-Columbia

ADDRESS Division of Biological Sciences
Bond Life Science Center
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211

TELEPHONE (573) 882-3440

EMAIL angelovicir@missouri.edu

EDUCATION

Tel Aviv University, Israel. BS in Plant Science, 1998
Tel Aviv University, Israel. BS in Plant Science, 2001
The Weizmann Institute of Science. PhD in Science, 2009

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Assistant Professor, Division of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Missouri, 2015-present

Postdoctoral Associate, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department, Michigan State University, MI, 2010-2015

Postdoctoral Associate, Plant Science Department, the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, 2009-2010


HONORS AND AWARDS

Postdoctoral Independent Career Potential Award. Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA. 2015

MEMBERSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

American Society of Plant Biologist

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Ruthie Angelovici


Assets

CS-6-4 - Uncovering the genetic and metabolic relationship between free and bound amino acid composition in seeds using novel high-throughput quantification method combined with GWAS



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