Education

Abstract

CS-2-1 - FPsc: Next Generation Resources for Plant-based Education and Research in Genetics and Genomic Sciences

Sunday, July 15
1:03 PM - 1:23 PM

FPsc (fast plants, self-compatible) is a novel variety of rapid-cycling Brassica rapa created through a triparental mating scheme involving Wisconsin Fast Plants® (WFP) and two self-compatible but not-so-rapid B. rapa accessions, IMB211 and Ceres. After thorough mixing and meiotic fractionation of parental genomes, we imposed 6 generations of selection and advancement by selfing and single-seed descent to yield the inbred FPsc reference genotype. Thereafter, students at UW-Madison used chemical (EMS) mutagenesis to isolate a diverse collection of mutant derivatives whose phenotypes are clearly distinct from the wild type parent and transmit to progeny generations as well-behaved Mendelian characters. Concurrently, our students developed a genome-wide collection of PCR-based molecular markers useful to map mutant loci; identification and characterization of causative mutant alleles has been facilitated by efforts at the JGI to generate a de novo assembly of the FPsc genome. Finally, we will also describe the creation and use of an R500 x FPsc Advanced Intercross Recombinant Inbred Line (AI-RIL) population to map loci that condition expression of several quantitatively variable traits in B. rapa.


While of potential use to advance plant biology research, our primary interest in developing an integrated suite of genetic resources based on the FPsc model system is to enhance K-16 education in genetics, evolution, and genomic sciences. Thus, we have developed several innovative curricular modules including The Mating Game, an engaging and fun way for students to reimagine fundamental genetic principles; a controlled experiment in artificial selection that emphasizes the role of extant genetic variation in enabling a heritable response to selective pressure; and GameteMaker, a web-based genetic mapping simulation “app” that faithfully recapitulates the steps and thought processes involved in gene mapping experiments and can help students to make the conceptual leap from observable phenotype to underlying, DNA sequence-based, genotype.


 

Co-Authors

Richard Amasino – University of Wisconsin-Madison

Scott Woody

Associate Scientist
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Scott Woody


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CS-2-1 - FPsc: Next Generation Resources for Plant-based Education and Research in Genetics and Genomic Sciences



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