Biotic Stress/Applied Plant Bio

Abstract

CS-13-6 - Damage changes the optimal light color for growth and reproduction of Arabidopsis thaliana

Monday, July 16
2:43 PM - 2:45 PM

Tissue removal by mammalian herbivores is common and often intensely stressful for plants to mitigate (to “tolerate” damage).  While damaged plants often exhibit substantially altered regrowth patterns relative to undamaged growth, different plant genotypes differ in their regrowth and reproductive success when damaged.  During normal growth, many plants develop increased cellular genome copy number (“endopolyploidy”) relative to their inherited ploidy via genome re-replication.  The degree to which a damaged plant can invest in generating endopolyploidy during regrowth affects its tolerance ability.  The Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes Columbia-4 and Landsberg erecta increase or decrease, respectively, size, reproduction, and endopolyploidy when damaged relative to when undamaged.  Finally, different wavelengths of light cue development—blue light typically promotes vegetative growth while red light stimulates flowering.  Using Columbia-4 and Landsberg erecta grown in red, blue, and white light, we determined whether light interacts with genotype and endopolyploidy to influence undamaged growth and reproduction, as well as damage tolerance.  Half of the plants of each genotype×light group were clipped during growth, simulating mammalian herbivory.  We measured size (stem length), seed yield, and endopolyploidy.  Despite inherent differences in size and seed yield, both genotypes increased size, seed yield, and endopolyploidy in increasingly blue light (rederecta maintained these measures under red light when clipped relative to reductions in these measures under white and blue light when clipped.  Undamaged and damaged plants therefore have different optimal light colors (blue and red, respectively) regardless of genotype, indicating light color’s influence on development following damage perhaps by differentially promoting endopolyploidy.


 

Co-Authors

Hannah Haller – University of Indianapolis

Daniel Scholes

Assistant Professor
University of Indianapolis

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Daniel Scholes


Assets

CS-13-6 - Damage changes the optimal light color for growth and reproduction of Arabidopsis thaliana



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Damage changes the optimal light color for growth and reproduction of Arabidopsis thaliana