Biochemistry

Abstract

CS-1-4 - Sex-dependent variation of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima cv Big Max) nectar and nectaries as determined by proteomics and metabolomics

Sunday, July 15
2:03 PM - 2:23 PM

Nectar is a floral reward that sustains mutualisms with pollinators, which in turn, improves fruit set. While it is known that nectar is a chemically complex solution, extensive identification and quantification of this complexity has been lacking. Cucurbita maxima c.v. Big Max, like many cucurbits, is monecious with separate male and female flowers. Attraction of bees to the flowers through the reward of nectar is essential for reproductive success in this economically valuable crop. In this study, the sex-dependent variation in composition of male and female nectar and the nectary were defined using a combination of GC-MS based metabolomics and LC-MS/MS based proteomics. Metabolomics analysis of nectar detected 88 metabolites, of which 40 were positively identified, and included sugars, sugar alcohols, aromatics, diols, organic acids, and amino acids. There were differences in 29 metabolites between male and female nectar. The nectar proteome consisted of 46 proteins, of which 70% overlapped between nectar types. Only two proteins were unique to female nectar, compared to 10 specific to male nectar. The nectary proteome, defined using iTRAQ labeling, was composed of 339 proteins, 71% of which were descriptively annotatable by homology to Plantae. The abundance of 45 proteins differed significantly between male and female nectaries. This rich dataset significantly expands the known complexity of nectar composition.


 

Co-Authors

Patrick von Aderkas – University of Victoria; Clay Carter – University of Minnesota Twin Cities; Derek Smith – UVic Genome BC Proteomics Centre; Monica Elliott – UVic Genome BC Proteomics Centre; Basil Nikolau – Iowa State University

Elizabeth Chatt

Graduate Student
Iowa State University

Elizabeth Chatt is a plant biology PhD candidate at Iowa State University in Dr. Basil Nikolau’s lab. Her research focuses on nectaries and nectar in dicots, more specifically pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). The primary objective of this work is to determine conserved molecular mechanisms across dicots by which nectar is produced and secreted. Secondarily, this work compares variation in structure and metabolite composition between nectaries and their secreted nectar based on the ecological roles of the nectary. These objectives are being met by leveraging the power of a broad “omics” approach to include metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics as well as microscopy and mass spectrometry imaging.

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CS-1-4 - Sex-dependent variation of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima cv Big Max) nectar and nectaries as determined by proteomics and metabolomics



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Send Email for CS-1-4 - Sex-dependent variation of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima cv Big Max) nectar and nectaries as determined by proteomics and metabolomics