Historic Preservation/Restoration

Education Session - Panel Format

FRI-C03 - Thinking Inclusive: Strategies and Perspectives on Accessibility from Central Park’s Experience

Friday, October 19
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 122

1.5 PDH, LA CES/HSW, AICP, FL, NY/HSW

Equal access to the public realm regardless of disability is the law; but neither the ADA nor accessibility standards and guidelines resolve the challenges of making the complex public environment universally accessible. Panelists will share their insights based on involvement in accessibility projects in Central Park and other relevant experience.

Learning Objectives:

Lane Addonizio, Affil. ASLA, AICP

Vice President for Planning
Central Park Conservancy

Ms. Addonizio is responsible for managing the Conservancy’s Planning, Design and Construction department and its execution of the physical planning effort and restoration program for the Park. Prior to joining the Central Park Conservancy in 2002, she work with Conservancy founder Elizabeth Barlow Rogers at the Cityscape Institute, a small not-for-profit formed to assist community groups and municipalities with public space improvement initiatives, and as a campus planner for Harvard University. She serves on the board of directors of the National Association for Olmsted Parks as well as New Destiny Housing Corporation in New York City.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Lane Addonizio

Christopher J. Nolan, FASLA

Chief Operating Officer & Chief Landscape Architect
Central Park Conservancy

Serving as the Park’s chief landscape architect since 1996, Chris Nolan is the Chief Operating Officer and Central Park Administrator. In this dual role, he leads the restoration and management work that is central to the Conservancy’s mission as the organization responsible for the stewardship of Central Park. Along with a multidisciplinary inhouse team of planning and design professionals responsible for planning, design, construction of the Park’s landscapes, structures, and infrastructure, Mr. Nolan oversees the park managers, horticulturalists, and technicians who maintain the Park and Conservancy staff responsible for visitor services and public programs.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Christopher Nolan

Victor Calise

Commissioner
New York City's Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities

As Commissioner, Victor sets disability policy, advises the Mayor and city agencies, creates partnerships and initiatives that better the lives of people with disabilities, advocates for the passage of legislation; and is the chair of the Accessibility Committee of the NYC Building Code. Under his leadership he is working to make New York City the most accessible city in the world in Transportation, Employment, Education and Access to city services and programs. Prior to leading MOPD, Victor joined the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Coordinator.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Victor Calise

Tim Fendley

Partner & Creative Director
Applied Wayfinding

Tim Fendley founded Applied Wayfinding to push the boundaries of information design. Through Applied’s work on Legible Cities projects, the firm has become a standard-setter for empathetic wayfinding design guided by a focus on how people experience place. Projects like Legible London, the most comprehensive urban wayfinding project of its kind, and I Walk NYC, a city-wide pedestrian strategy, reflect Tim’s passion for making complex places more understandable—a central challenge of the project to develop an accessible map and guide for Central Park, envisioned as the first step of a more comprehensive and multi-faceted accessible wayfinding system for the Park.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Tim Fendley


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FRI-C03 - Thinking Inclusive: Strategies and Perspectives on Accessibility from Central Park’s Experience

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