Watershed

Oral

397941 - Modeling Thermal Pollution in Urbanized Watersheds Using a Hybrid Approach

Thursday, June 7
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Greenway IJ
Co-Authors: David Sample, Virginia Beach – Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Tess Thompson, Blacksburg – Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Mohammad Nayeb Yazdi, Virginia Beach – Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Urban development significantly increases water temperatures within watersheds, primarily from the construction of impervious surfaces for buildings and pavement. While thermally enriched runoff can be harmful to aquatic life, little information on modeling thermal processes at a watershed scale is available. The goal of this modeling assessment is to provide guidance on how to achieve necessary temperature regimes that meet aquatic health criteria for sensitive species such as trout. To address this need, the Minnesota Urban Heat Export Tool (MINUHET) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) models were utilized to simulate streamflow, water temperature, and heat flux through a large and a small urban watershed for a typical summer. SWMM and MINUHET were combined in a unique, hybrid approach that used the strengths of each, i.e., SWMM for runoff and streamflow, and MINUHET for water temperature. The small and large watersheds were 0.23 and 14.1 km2, respectively, and represent portions of Stroubles Creek near downtown Blacksburg, Virginia and the main campus of Virginia Tech. Streamflow and water temperature data were available for a series of continuous storm events through the Virginia Tech StREAM Lab (Stream Research, Education, and Management). The four models of SWMM and MINUHET (two models for each watershed) were calibrated manually for the summers of 2016 and 2017, and were validated for the summer of 2015. Model sensitivity analyses revealed that simulations were especially sensitive to imperviousness (SWMM for runoff and streamflow) and dew point temperature (MINUHET for temperature). Results indicated similar statistical performance (NSE and R2) for the hybrid approach (simulated heat load versus observed heat load) at the outlet of both watersheds.

Theresa Maria Thompson


Biological Systems Engineering, VA Tech

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Theresa Thompson

Mehdi Ketabchy


Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Mehdi Ketabchy


Assets

397941 - Modeling Thermal Pollution in Urbanized Watersheds Using a Hybrid Approach



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Modeling Thermal Pollution in Urbanized Watersheds Using a Hybrid Approach