Groundwater

Oral

397895 - Investigation of Downhole Corrosion at the T-Bar Well Field in Winkler County, Texas

Wednesday, June 6
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location: Lakeshore B
Co-Authors: Fayruj Ahmed, Lubbock, TX – Texas Tech University; Kayleigh Millerick, Lubbock, TX – Texas Tech University; Jay Edwards, Midland, TX – Midland County Fresh Water Supply District; Ryan Kennerly, Lubbock, TX – Parkhill Smith & Cooper, Inc.; Landon Allen, Lubbock, TX – Parkill Smith & Cooper, Inc.; Weile Yan, Lubbock, TX – Texas Tech University

The Midland County Fresh Water Supply District #1 (MCFWSD) operates the T-Bar Well Field in Winkler County in West Texas. Currently 44 wells, ranging in total depth from 400 to 650 ft, produce flows ranging from 200 to 700 gpm from the Pecos Alluvium. Corrosion and deterioration of the steel pumps and column pipes were noted in many of the new wells. Initial response was replacement of the damaged pumps and/or pipes with corrosion-resistant or epoxy-coated materials in several wells. The District staff engaged a research team from Texas Tech University to evaluate potential causes of corrosion, such as water chemistry (pH, alkalinity, and other constituents), physical soil conditions, formation and production zone depths, presence of oil and gas piping and related infrastructure, and electrolysis caused by stray current or dissimilar metals. Initial evaluations of water quality concluded that the water chemistry that traditional corrosion indices based on calcium carbonate scale formation were in the non-corrosive ranges, while consideration of other ions that facilitate dissolution of iron and the hydraulic retention time did indicate corrosivity after five days of exposure. Corrosion impacts were most severe in wells that were seldom pumped. Visual observation of thick brown slime on the pumps and column pipes when removed encouraged the team to collect samples for analyses for microbial induced corrosion indicators. Sulfate reducing bacteria, iron oxidizing bacteria, and iron reducing bacteria were all noted at high concentrations, which can lead to complex microniche environments that can quickly attack the steel surfaces. The District staff and research team are identifying additional mitigation strategies in this ongoing project.

Ken Rainwater, Texas

Professor
Texas Tech University

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397895 - Investigation of Downhole Corrosion at the T-Bar Well Field in Winkler County, Texas



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