Water, Wastewater & Stormwater

Oral

394801 - LONG TERM ANALYSIS OF SEWAGE SPILL OVERFLOW (SSO) IN CALIFORNIA

Tuesday, June 5
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Location: Greenway EF
Co-Authors: Julio Nunez, 1250 Bellflower Blvd. Long Beach CA – California State University, Long Beach; Rebeka Sultana, 1250 Bellflower Blvd. Long Beach, CA – California State University, Long Beach; Antony Gabriele, 1250 Bellflower Blvd. Long Beach CA – California State University, Long Beach

The 9-year SSO summary shows there was a total of 46,959 SSO cases associated with a volume of spill of 211.3 million gallons (MG). The average annual CA SSO case reported was 5,217.7±801.8 cases, and the average volume spill was 23.5±27.3 MG. There was no significant relationship between both parameters. The highest annual SSO case number reported was 6,519 cases (2008), while the smallest SSO case number reported of 3,672 (2015). After 2008 the decreasing numbers of SSO cases were remarkably observed. Excluding 2010 data (spike data), the average annual volume spill was 14.1±7.1 MG.
When annual SSO data were classified by RWQCB and cumulated from 2007-2015, RWQCB 5 reported the highest SSO cases of 21,302. However, the approximate maximum spill volume of 79.4 MG was documented from RWQCB 2 with the 2nd highest SSO cases. The Pearson correlation coefficients and degree of significance of 9-year monthly SSO case data among RWQCBs and entire State were obtained. The results indicated each RWQCB had significant relationship with the CA data. This implied that temporal factors affected more on the number of SSO reported in each subregion and the entire CA.
While similar analysis was calculated using annual SSO case data from each RWQCB and CA. Analysis found statistically significant correlation among all 9 RWQCB. On the other hand, there no significant relationship between numbers of CA SSO reported. The annual SSO case data relationship suggested there were slightly impacts of spatial parameters because all relationships between each RWQCB were statistically significant.

Pitiporn Asvapathanagul

Assistant Professor
California State University, Long Beach

Dr. Pitiporn Asvapathanagul is an assistant professor in Environmental Engineering at CSULB. She graduated from UC, Irvine in 2011. Her expertise is molecular biology in water and wastewater treatment processes. Her research are related to (i) micropollutants in groundwater and wastewater combined with soil aquifer treatment, (ii) solids separation problems (foaming/bulking) in full-scale nitrification/denitrification water reclamation plants, (iii) aeration diffuser biofilm fouling associated with energy consumption, (iv) trends of sewage spill overflow in California, (v) nutrient removal in biological treatment processes, (vi) pathogens in drinking water and wastewater,(vii) microbial source tracking in Los Angeles and Coyote Creek rivers, and (viii) biocementation.

Jim Nguyen is currently studying in his third year at CSULB. He initially entered CSULB with a major in Chemistry with the intent of pursuing a career in Dentistry; however, after developing a deep interest in chemical processes and manufacturing, he decided to pursue Chemical Engineering while keeping Chemistry as his minor. Although he has switched his intended career choice from a health profession to an engineering profession, his passion for helping his community still remains. Presently, Jim is currently employed as an undergraduate research assistant under Dr. Asvapathanagul and is currently working on two projects: Adsorption of Endocrine Disrupting compounds through Soil Aquifer Treatment and Monitoring Organochlorine Pesticides, Polychlorinated Biphenyls, and Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons in Wastewater and Groundwater. Through these two projects, Jim hopes to learn more about the effectiveness of current wastewater reclamation technologies and contribute to developing a new method for treating tertiary treated wastewater.

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