Water Distribution

Oral

394767 - A Discrete Event Simulation Model of Post-Earthquake Restoration of Water Distribution Systems: Validation and Case Study Using Data from the 2014 South Napa Earthquake

Tuesday, June 5
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Location: Lakeshore C
Co-Authors: Henry Burton, Los Angeles – University of California Los Angeles

Water supply and distribution systems are vital to the well-being of communities since schools, businesses, neighborhood districts and other lifeline systems (e.g., energy) all rely on water to maintain their functionality. The City of Napa’s water distribution system serves approximately 80,000 people and is supplied by three main sources: Lake Hennessey, Jamieson Canyon, and Milliken Reservoir. The distribution system includes 12 tanks and 337 miles of distribution pipe. Following the 2014 South Napa Earthquake, 250 pipe breaks were identified, including the main transmission line from the Milliken Reservoir. Luckily, half of the repairs were completed within five days, and the service disruptions were brief.

The 2014 South Napa magnitude 6 earthquake is considered a moderate event. However, a major earthquake occurring in the same region could potentially cause extensive damage to the water system. Post-earthquake restoration models of these systems can be used as a decision-support tool to help plan for such an event. This presentation will describe the use of pipe leak and break data from the 2014 event, to evaluate and calibrate a Discrete Event Simulation (DES) post-earthquake restoration model. The DES model will represent the water system as a set of entities (e.g. pipes, tanks) that interact through a sequence of events (e.g. earthquake damage, inspection, repairs) of variable duration that may be triggered at different points in time depending on entity attributes (e.g. pipe vulnerability), access to resources (e.g. finance, manpower), and the completion of other events. Finally, the hydraulic simulation will be performed on the water network to calculate and compare its serviceability during the sequence of events. The calibrated DES model will then be used to simulate the post-earthquake disruption and restoration of the City of Napa’s water supply for a major seismic event on the West Napa fault.

Agam Tomar

Ph.D. Student
University of California Los Angeles

Agam Tomar is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is majoring in Earthquake Engineering with minor in Electrical Engineering and Statistics. He received his Bachelor in Civil Engineering and Masters in Structural Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi. His research focus in on measuring the resilience of spatially and temporally distributed infrastructure systems. His research interests include PSHA (Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis), Network Analysis, Deep Learning, High-Performance Computing, Convex Optimization and Kalman Filtering.

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