Hydro-Climate Symposium

Oral

394697 - Analysis of physical mechanisms of the 2017 Kita-Kyushu storm in Japan by means of regional atmospheric model

Tuesday, June 5
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Location: Lake Superior B
Co-Authors: Terunori Omoto, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555, Japan – Kumamoto University; Takehide Hama, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555, Japan – Kumamoto University

An extremely intense precipitation happened at the north part of Kyushu region, Japan, on July 7th, 2017. The observed precipitation was much higher than the historical record at the region. Especially, at an observation station, the recurrence period of the observed precipitation cannot be obtained by the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution because the observed precipitation was too high. This result indicate that a different physical mechanism may have caused the intense precipitation. In this context, the atmospheric conditions during the storm was reconstructed by means of a regional atmospheric model. Then the three-dimensional atmospheric processes were analyzed to reveal the cause of the intense precipitation. The results of the analysis show that high-moisture atmospheric flows near surface directed toward the region, and converged around the observation station due to the complicated topography of the Kyushu region. Meanwhile, a stationary front stayed near the region during the storm. This combination of the converged high-moisture atmospheric flows and the stationary flow would cause the extremely intense precipitation at the region.

Kei Ishida, PhD

Assistant Professor
Kumamoto University

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394697 - Analysis of physical mechanisms of the 2017 Kita-Kyushu storm in Japan by means of regional atmospheric model



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